• cecedon

    posted on February 4, 2010 at 10:40 pm

    Love this series, knowing the flours makes such a big difference in the outcome of baked goods!

    Have you noticed how much easier it is to make a gravy or thicken a sauce with rice flour? It never worked as well when I used all purpose (wheat) flour in the old gluten days!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @cecedon, When I thicken a sauce I generally use arrowroot or cornstarch. I like arrowroot better because it’s supposed to be soothing for your digestive system.

    [Reply]

  • Linda- Kitchen Therapy

    posted on February 4, 2010 at 10:52 pm

    Thanks for the mentions sugar free, but still sweet Amy! I enjoy experimenting with high nutrition whole-grain gluten free flours. Some aren’t really true grains, but we use them like grain flours. Buckwheat, quinoa, and amaranth for example.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Linda- Kitchen Therapy, You are always a step ahead of me. :)

    [Reply]

  • Mom

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 7:57 am

    There are 8-10 different GF flours in my freezer. A good friend once remarked ‘you need another freezer just to store your flours’. You really do for the most nutritious ones, to keep them from going rancid. The white starches can go in the pantry.

    [Reply]

  • Nikki

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 9:29 am

    Thank you so much for this series Amy! I’m not much of a baker, so I’m definitely learning a lot.

    [Reply]

  • Alta (Tasty Eats At Home)

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 9:04 am

    This is a great series. I have a variety of flours, so I enjoy mixing them a great deal. I love sorghum and quinoa together with a bit of starch, such as tapioca. I wonder – is there a health benefit of one starch over another? Or are they basically all the same? I gravitate towards tapioca and arrowroot, basically because I have family members with corn intolerances (and I don’t want to develop one, if I happen to be prone to it) but I don’t know if they are any healthier, really.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Alta (Tasty Eats At Home), I am more prone to use arrowroot or tapioca starch too. Arrowroot is supposed to help calm your digestive system and be easier to digest. I don’t know how valid that info is, but it’s what I’ve read on the internet in several places.

    I resisted using potato starch for a long, long time but it really works well in breads.

    [Reply]

  • Sophie

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 9:46 am

    I love mixing flours. I have such a hard time finding “heavier” flours whose flavor I like. Teff is nice, but it can be too strong sometimes, if used too much. I love buckwheat. I’m still trying to figure out which ones are the tastiest and most affordable :D .

    [Reply]

  • Sandy Gillett

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 4:14 pm

    Wonderful series. I have a question. I went to buy potato starch and the only thing they had was ener g’s “Potato Starch Flour”. I’m assuming it’s potato starch. However, I have read some recipes which say “Do not use potato flour, it will not work.” So, is “Potato Starch Flour”, potato starch or potato flour? Any help anyone can give me is so appreciated.
    Thank you Amy once again.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sandy Gillett, I’m not sure – I would check their website or call them. I’ve called them before with questions and they’re quite helpful. Let us know what you find out – it will help other people. (Me, too!)

    [Reply]

    Sandy Gillett Reply:

    @Amy, I don’t know why I didn’t think of that. I went to the website and they also have a product called potato flour so I’m assuming potato starch flour is potato starch. I’m going to use it as such. If I have any problems I’ll let everyone know.

    [Reply]

  • Maggie Savage

    posted on February 5, 2010 at 6:46 pm

    This is amazing Amy. Thank you so much.

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    posted on February 6, 2010 at 11:58 pm

    I just saw on a coupon website that I frequent often that there’s a deal for gluten free products- http://www.southernsavers.com/2010/02/ingles-weekly-ad-27-213/

    Just thought I’d share in case anyone was interested!

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    posted on February 7, 2010 at 12:05 pm

    Thank you for posting this series, Amy. It’s been very educational, & I enjoy learning more about GF flours.

    [Reply]

  • Striving Bean

    posted on February 8, 2010 at 8:50 pm

    Great posts. I tried gluten free flour for the first time this weekend. Now I know why my cookies turned out so light and delicate. I’ll keep tuning in to learn more.

    [Reply]

  • allyson

    posted on February 11, 2010 at 7:47 am

    So i have what seems to be a silly question, but i’m not much of a baker…still learning.
    When recipes, or especially flour mixes say “4 parts this, 1 part that” how does that translate exactly?
    Thanks again for an awesome website, it has been so helpful!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @allyson, Not a silly question at all – using your example if you had 4 parts of sorghum flour and 1 part tapioca starch then each part would be an equal amount. You could use cups, tablespoons, teaspoons – it all depends on what you need the mix for.

    [Reply]

  • Carina

    posted on July 31, 2011 at 5:15 pm

    Hi,

    I’m interested in giving up wheat for weight loss, and also to see if it helps clear up some recurring rashes. I’ve thought about cutting out all flour altogether a few times, but then I end up getting intrigued, and totally confused, by the alternatives. What do you think? If the primary goal is weight loss, should I look to eliminate wheat, gluten or just all flours, no matter what they’re made of? I don’t want to go to the trouble or expense of making alternatives or buying things like gluten-free crackers if I should just avoid crackers in general.
    Any thoughts?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Carina, What works for my body is a diet that is primarily built around natural, whole foods. I shop the perimeter of the grocery store. An occasional dessert is a treat. I can eat gluten-free flours but it’s a very small part of my diet. I can’t touch wheat.

    [Reply]

  • Lee

    posted on December 6, 2012 at 11:40 pm

    Thankyou for the interesting information. My stomach over the last year has decided it doesnt like much at all. Thankfully quinoa and corn are my friends so I have been experimenting with these flours with varying results. I think now having read this I may just have a little more success. So thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

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