• Iris

    posted on April 18, 2010 at 6:32 pm

    I don’t eat them very often, but it has less to do with nutrition than the fact that I don’t like them unless they’re in a soup or doused with a sauce or gravy. I think they’re rather boring on their own. I’ll take a sweet potato any day! I do love creamy soups though, and this looks delicious!

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  • Lauren

    posted on April 18, 2010 at 6:57 pm

    Honestly, I love any type of potato. We tend to buy the smaller, thin skinned ones more often, but big starchy ones have their place too! This soup looks like a lovely way to enjoy them =D.

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  • Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen

    posted on April 18, 2010 at 8:18 pm

    Potatoes are just so darn good aren’t they?! :) I prefer sweet potatoes and squash over potatoes too but it is hard to resist a really tasty & creamy potato soup! This looks lovely! :)

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  • Walden121

    posted on April 18, 2010 at 9:51 pm

    I love potatoes. This recipe sounds delicious!

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  • Jenn

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 2:08 am

    Great looking soup, I’d never think of adding in Neufchâtel cheese! I personally love potatoes, we use them all the time – though we usually get fingerlings or new potatoes, and ALWAYS keep the skins on, even when making mashed potatoes – the skin adds more flavor in my opinion. I bet this would be a good soup with kale too instead of spinach!

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    Amy Reply:

    @Jenn, I would have kept the skins on if I wasn’t practicing knife cuts. I love the rustic quality they give a soup. Fingerlings are next on my list. :)

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  • Hallie @ Daily Bites

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 7:45 am

    I prefer the flavor and texture of sweet potatoes, winter squash, and carrots…but white fleshed potatoes certainly have their place in my kitchen! I use them for oil-and-vinegar dressed potato salads, roasted to go along with chicken, or grated for potato pancakes. Most often I use sweets, but every few weeks I’ll throw in reds or goldens for some variety. :)

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  • Aubree Cherie

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 8:38 am

    I actually love white potato’s. I’ve recently started to eat them less though because I did start to realize they were more empty in nutrition than other things I could be using. I think what you’ve done with them are pretty amazing though – as a drawing board for other great nutrients! Looks like a very tasty soup :)

    ~Aubree Cherie

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  • Cara

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 11:53 am

    I wonder how I could make this soup without using dairy … any ideas out there ?? :)

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    Amy Reply:

    @Cara, Try veggie stock instead of milk. Blend the potatoes with 1/2 – 3/4 cup of raw cashews instead of the cheeses. Some people soak the cashews first – I have a VitaMix and don’t need to. If you have a blender that doesn’t have tons of muscle, you might soak them first to get a really smooth finish.

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  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 11:57 am

    That is a beautiful soup, Amy! I’m imagining the creamy texture and the potato and spinach flavors. I love both of those equally. I love all the onion in this recipe, too. I just had a baked white potato with some roasted chicken as topping for my lunch. I don’t eat them nearly as much as I used to though. If I’m doing baked potatoes for dinner, hubby gets a baked white potato and I get a baked sweet potato usually. ;-) I’ve never used Neufchatel before, but it sounds just right for this soup.

    Thanks!
    Shirley

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  • Mary Bailey

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 12:41 pm

    ok, two things>
    One: 20 pounds of potatoes for $4.50? That sounds like a culinary bargain, not “tons of money. ”
    Two: Some potatoes are blue-fleshed, but most are white or creamy-coloured. It’s not like white flour or white rice, potatoes come by their pale colour naturally and are an excellent source of nutrition. No, I don’t work for the potato board but I do think potatoes take a bad rap. They’re nutritious, filling and cheap— eat the skin for even more nutrition bonus points.
    daughter of a potato farmer

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    Amy Reply:

    @Mary Bailey, I think you misunderstood the post or I was totally unclear (it happens often…)- I thought $4.50 was once heck of deal, which is why I bought them so I could cut them up and toss them out. Then came the change of heart.

    I agree with you that potatoes have gotten a bad rap – and I did mention that they’re rated as one of the world’s healthiest foods at whfoods.org

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  • Mary Bailey

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 12:42 pm

    more

    even better if you buy them from a local farmer not at costco, if you live in a potato-growing region, of course.

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  • Renee

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 1:32 pm

    When I intially read the post and thought about my potato usage I thought, nah, I don’t eat many potatoes. I think I have the same sort of feelings as you, that they aren’t that healthy. And in reality, I probably eat a lot fewer than the average American. And when I do buy a bag, they usually go bad before I get to them all. The more I thought about it though, they do have a place in my diet.

    A lot of the Indian dishes I make have potatoes in them. My mom’s potato soup that I crave when I am sick. A Swiss chard with potato curry I make with the abundance of chard. When camping or grilling, potato packets are a great and easy side dish. Taco potatoes (taco seasoning with beans over potatoes with all the taco fixings), a quick meal. Broccoli and cheese over a potato. And the once a year potato salad for a picnic. During green bean season I like to cook little new potatoes from the farmer’s market with green beans.

    But they definitely aren’t a weekly staple around our house.

    Regardless, this recipe looks good. A nice combo with the spinach. Chard might be good too.

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    Amy Reply:

    @Renee, Chard would be great in this soup, especially if you’re planning on leftovers. I’m starting to think my ‘potato boycott’ might have been hasty. Once in a while they’re absolutely fabulous.

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  • Jessica Meyer

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 1:44 pm

    Wow, that is a lot of potatoes for that price! I never think to shop at Costco and I have one close to my house! Do they offer a lot of organic choices? I love cooking potato soups, including white and sweet potato soups. They are a great source of potassium! A favorite guilty pleasure of mine is oven baked fries :)

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    Amy Reply:

    @Jessica Meyer, Costco has great organic produce and many, many organic items. Their organic frozen broccoli is one of my favs for a quick go to side dish for dinner.

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  • Holly

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 2:06 pm

    Look delicious! I was inspired by your blog to start a 30-day challenge of going gluten and sugar free to see if that changes the way I feel. Your recipes make it seem like I haven’t given anything up by making these healthy changes!

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  • Z's Cup of Tea

    posted on April 19, 2010 at 2:22 pm

    This sounds lovely! I saw the photo and thought, “Mm, what’s that?” I have most of the ingredients, though I think I’d make it with coconut milk and forgo the cheese to make it dairy-free – although the cheese does sound good.

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  • Posy

    posted on April 20, 2010 at 9:12 am

    Love your site Amy! Have been working with a dietitian due to a recent diagnosis of ‘leaky gut’. According to my dietitian small new potatoes are lower on the glycemic index than the big white ones, so I try and buy those when I need them. Couldn’t make it on this new way of eating without you site, so THANK YOU!

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    Amy Reply:

    @Posy, My gratitude for the kind words. I hope you’ve been able to make some progress with your gut issues. Nutrition makes a huge difference, doesn’t it?

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  • Alta

    posted on April 20, 2010 at 9:25 am

    Glad to see you’ve had a change of heart for poor little ol’ potato! Potatoes do get a bad rap. After all, they’re about the only vegetable consumed on the S.A.D., usually in fried and/or mashed form, with bunches of fat added. This soup, on the other hand, looks delicious and healthy. I don’t eat potatoes super-often (maybe once every 2 weeks), but they’re great sources of Vitamin C and soluble fiber, and they’re even better for you if you include the skin. I’m guilty of saving my potatoes for days when I’m feeding the kids – they’re picky eaters, but they’ll chow down on roasted potato fries or baked potatoes. Reasonably healthy, filling, and cheap – they make the grade at our house.

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    Amy Reply:

    @Alta, Totally agreed! I made a fabulous (and so simple) potato and onion soup over the weekend and I think we’re going to have the leftovers for dinner. I call it Poor Man’s Soup because with a nice salad, you have a meal for two for less than $2.

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  • Walden121

    posted on May 16, 2010 at 12:21 pm

    Lovely recipe, thank you! I tried it myself, making a few diversions.

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    Amy Reply:

    @Walden121, So good to know. I appreciate that you took the time to come back and share that with me. Hugs!!

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  • Jessica

    posted on January 9, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    I just made this, literally just ate it! I love that I can have a cream soup and be GF! I added some portabella mushrooms diced and some celery (I really hate throwing away veggies, can you tell?). I also couldn’t find Neufchatel cheese (should have gone to Trader Joe’s), so I used cream cheese. I like the light flavors but I felt like I was missing an oomph flavor. I think it may have been the cheese? I’ll try to find it for next time. Thanks for a healthy creamy soup I can eat! BTW the portabellas added a nice flavor (I added like 1/2 cup of the baby ones diced). Added a rustic feel to it.

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    Amy Reply:

    @Jessica, Yes, this soup is yummy, Jessica. Neufchatel cheese is just light cream cheese – it’s got less calories and less fat. Maybe it needed a little salt and pepper??

    Hugs,
    Amy

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    Jessica Reply:

    @Amy, Yes I am snowed in so I had no way of getting white pepper. Today, sitting in the fridge for a day, the flavors were much stronger! I added salt and pepper (forgot the broth was no sugar added) and it was perfect! Super excited for leftovers. I’m single so when I make soup it’s good for a week or so. I did invite neighbors over for some tomorrow if we are still snowed in! Thanks for the recipe!

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    Amy Reply:

    @Jessica, Whenever my food tastes a little bland, the first thing I do is add just a little salt because it helps intensify the flavors. Depending on the recipe, I might add pepper. If that doesn’t work I think about what flavors I want more of and go from there.

    Soup is usually better the next day, anyway.

    Enjoy the mandated rest of being snowed in!! So glad you have power and food. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

  • Kate

    posted on February 1, 2011 at 1:49 pm

    Why not just make this with Sweet potatoes?? Or a combo of white and sweet? Spinach, chard, kale….yummmmm…

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  • Christianne

    posted on February 1, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    We have 4 huge Yukon’s sitting in the bin and I had no idea what I was going to do with them. Now I do. Thank you for that brilliant idea and for loving the lowly spud back to popularity, at least for today!
    Thanks to my Evo I was able to check out the recipe while I was shopping at WF which allowed me to pick up some neuftachel. I have everything else in the fridge! This was meant to be :)

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