• carrie @ gingerlemongirl.com

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 8:58 am

    WOw! Look amazing Amy! I can’t wait to try it!!

    [Reply]

  • Brandon

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 9:04 am

    This looks beautiful. I can’t wait to take these ideas and try it out for myself. :)

    [Reply]

  • gaile

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 9:24 am

    Your bread looks lovely! I’ve been nurturing my own gf starters for a few weeks now, and finally have them happy and bubbly. I tried one loaf, but the teff flour is just too strong tasting and overwhelms the sourdough flavour. I want a very sour loaf, but I think I will try your recipe to get a feel for it, and then adjust from there to use more starter, and perhaps less water and no instant yeast. Does that make sense? And thank you!!

    [Reply]

  • Britt

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 9:25 am

    Wow, Amy. I have to say, I am rarely impressed by other people’s gluten-free breads, but this is simply stunning. Fabulous job.

    [Reply]

  • Jeanine

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 9:30 am

    I am very, very intrigued. What a great looking loaf, and the method is quite different from any GF breads I’ve seen or made. A thing of beauty! Now I wish I’d started my starter already!

    [Reply]

  • Peter Bronski

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 9:32 am

    Hi Amy… I second the praise of the other commenters. This is one of the more beautiful loaves of gluten-free bread I’ve seen. I feel as though I can taste the texture of the crust and crumb just by looking at the pictures. Very nice work. Definitely a recipe I’m going to try.

    Cheers, Pete

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Peter Bronski, Thanks, Peter…it is a tasty loaf. It’s been fun playing around with different gluten-free bread recipes and figuring out what works and what doesn’t. The starter definitely adds a flavor and texture component that makes it really delicious.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Maggie

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 10:23 am

    Congrats Amy, this is stunning bread! I agree with Peter, I can just taste it! I am off to check out the sourdough starter recipe to see if I can get it going today. This loaf will be such a treat. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. xo

    [Reply]

  • Becky D

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 10:44 am

    I’m starting my starter now – and hopefully in a couple weeks, I’ll be able to make this fabulous bread!

    [Reply]

  • Andrea

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 11:59 am

    When I look at this bread, I want to cry! And not because it’s so beautiful (which it is), it’s because I can’t tolerate yeast. I would love to make my own bread, but I don’t know how to do it without yeast. I currently buy a brown rice bread that claims to use a “traditional starter”, but I don’t know what that is. The bakery says that it doesn’t contain yeast. Is it possible to make a starter without yeast? I know I’m not alone….. Can you help?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Andrea, There’s still yeast in a natural starter – there’s natural yeast on flour and they can develop the yeast that way. Sometimes too they use the yeast on grapes or onions to get the starter going.

    I don’t know your particular dietary restrictions when it comes to yeast nor do I know if the bakery is talking about the bread not having natural yeast or added yeast. Wish I could be of more help. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Jeanine

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 12:01 pm

    Why is it that most GF breads require only one rising…what does that do to it? How does this bread change with the two rising times? I wonder what 2 risings would do to my regular GF bread recipe? What are your thoughts on this?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeanine, Great question, Jeanine. You really only need gluten-free bread to rise once before baking it but I have been working on getting more ‘bread-like’ flavor into my gluten-free breads. Wheat bread is usually made over the course of at least 3 – 4 hours, often longer, which gives enough time for flavor to develop. When you mix the bread and bake it an hour later it just doesn’t taste as good.

    I found that you can let it rise, beat it down, shape it, and let it rise again and there’s more flavor.

    The starter obviously adds more flavor, too.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Jeanine Reply:

    @Amy, Thanks so much for the response Amy. I guess most of us are just happy to have our bread stay upright, and try to replicate the texture, but not necessarily the taste, of regular bread. You have me wondering now how my favorite sandwich bread, or even my cinnamon rolls, would taste if I used this method.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeanine, I printed your cinnamon rolls off a couple of weeks ago…plan to get to them sometime soon. I don’t know what I’m going to replace the vanilla pudding with yet – probably just tapioca starch or cornstarch. :) Any ideas?

    Carolyn Gaylord Reply:

    @Amy,
    It was always my understanding that ordinary bread was kneaded and allowed to rise the second time was to break down the gluten and give it a finer texture. This recipe sounds great i am going to make the starter and try the recipe. I have eliminated bread from my diet because it makes me feel so bloated, and I haven’t found any that are not as heavy as lead. Sometimes i just want to have a slice of bread, I miss bread with my eggs. Hope this recipe works.

    [Reply]

  • Summer

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 1:44 pm

    Thank you for this recipe. I can’t wait to try it out this weekend so I can have sandwiches out of it all next week. I just got bento sets from Laptop Lunches for my entire family, so I’ve been spending my Sundays cooking and baking different treats to enjoy throughout the work week.

    [Reply]

  • Jeanie

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 3:14 pm

    Amy,

    I think you get an Attt for this bread! lol
    It looks quite perfect!

    Have a Blessed Day!
    Jeanie

    [Reply]

  • Gluten Free Diva

    posted on March 3, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    Amy,

    You are a star pupil. This bread looks, well, it looks ideal. I hope your teacher gives you high marks for your discovery. I’ve been baking GF bread for a few years now and am just now beginning to experiment with sourdough. I can’t wait to try yours. I have a sneaky suspicion I’m going to love it!

    ~Ellen

    [Reply]

  • abbie

    posted on March 4, 2011 at 5:29 pm

    oh my gosh this look great! I am so going to try this…thanks for the post for the weekend?? :) If I can work this (I am not always successful with this GF baking thing) it seems so much more economical than the store-bought mixes out there…and it look so much more yummy. Kudos to you for working out the recipe on this one!!

    I have been a little MIA lately, but applications for private kindergarten are almost done. The process, the interviews, and my oldest actually being just that old have been quite a wave of overwhelming. I am hoping to get back on the GF baking band-wagon soon!
    Hugs, and thanks,
    Abbie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @abbie, So good to hear from you, Abbie! Glad your getting important life things done. We all have to prioritize. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Cherise Harper

    posted on March 4, 2011 at 7:29 pm

    Amy-This loaf is beautiful! It looks so much like wheat bread. I’d love to make it for myself and my sister but she has an egg allergy. Is it even possible to make a gluten free bread without eggs? Thanks so much for all your awesome recipes!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cherise Harper, Maggie at She Let Them Eat Cake made this loaf egg free – check out her post here:

    http://www.sheletthemeatcake.com/2011/03/simply-sugar-and-gluten-frees-perfect-bread/

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • carrie @ gingerlemongirl.com

    posted on March 7, 2011 at 11:07 am

    Made the bread yesterday Amy! I loved it! Very, very good! I’m sure as my starter matures it will only get better as well! Beautiful job!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @carrie @ gingerlemongirl.com, I’m working on recipes with more sour starter – this one doesn’t really have enough to add that sour flavor. Just enough to make a lighter loaf with those great, irregular air holes and better flavor. Glad you liked it.

    [Reply]

  • Hillary

    posted on March 11, 2011 at 1:27 pm

    I just made this loaf and it was so beautiful I could cry (don’t tell anyone but I did tear up!) It is so soft and the flavor is amazing- not too saourdoughy. My 7yo daughter has wheat allergies and bread is always a struggle. I think this might finally unthrone UDI’s for her favorite sandwich bread! Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    [Reply]

  • RuthAnn

    posted on May 15, 2011 at 7:40 am

    Do you know how many carbs and calories are in it?
    thanks RuthAnn

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @RuthAnn, No, I sure don’t. I don’t count carbs or calories. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Angie

    posted on May 31, 2011 at 10:19 pm

    Do you know how honey instead of palm sugar would affect the texture of the bread?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Angie, It’s just a tiny bit so it should be just fine.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Angie

    posted on June 6, 2011 at 7:46 am

    Hi Amy,

    Thank you for replying about the honey. I have another question for you. I’m getting pretty familiar with making gluten containing sourdough breads, but I’m still learning about gluten-free breads. I’m uncomfortable with the consistency of the dough I’m getting. Even with less water than the recipe calls for, it’s a very wet dough. I would definitely have to scoop it into the bread pans (rather than be able to pick it up like I do with gluten containing breads). Is that to be expected?

    Also, I am hesitant to mix on high. I’ve had problems with other sourdough breads when mixing on high (they didn’t rise well). Is that necessary for the gluten-free for some reason?

    Thanks so much!
    Angie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Angie, Yes, it’s a scoopable dough. Mixing on high adds air which helps the bread rise. Some wheat doughs are actually mixed on high to develop the gluten, but those are typically the breads with lots of fat. It’s a different process with gluten-free bread. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • AmandaonMaui

    posted on August 18, 2011 at 5:16 pm

    If we don’t have a plastic box for the second rise, what would you suggest? Would plastic wrap over the top of the loaf pan suffice?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @AmandaonMaui, If you wrap the top, there’s a chance that the plastic will stick to the dough and ruin your loaf. It’s not like gluten-full bread that can handle contact with the plastic. The box was cheap – maybe $4. Check Target or Wal-Mart. You can put it in your oven, too, if you have a bread rise option.

    [Reply]

  • Cara

    posted on August 25, 2011 at 9:52 pm

    I didn’t know I could fall in love with a bread. Now I know. This seriously looks INCREDIBLE Amy!!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cara, Thanks, Cara. I killed my starter when I got pregnant…I was too sick to touch it. I’m going to start another one soon.

    [Reply]

  • Tania

    posted on October 23, 2011 at 6:35 am

    TY My bread is amazing, cheap and quick, to make!

    I am the queen GF breadmaker and full time working solo mom of 3 kids, the middle child is celiacs.
    Breadmaking dilemna #257: I now have discovered we all have serious wheat&dairy+soy allergies and now yeast allergy with the overgrowth candida issue with the 2 year old: so no sugar, honey, starch roots etc .

    I am failing as a breadmaker with the no yeast bread and loved the ‘pinch’ of yeast in your starter, so got really excited.
    DO you have a recipe that would suit me, or can you shed some knowledge my way. Im a newbie all over again with this yeast issue.
    I cant use soy flour, yeast, citric acid, kinda tastes ok its just not ‘bread’ as we know it.
    signed giving up on the sandwich/soon to be Paleo diet chef!
    Tania – NZ

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Tania, Hi Tania! You can make sourdough starter by just letting the starter sit out and absorb the natural yeast in the air. Still, I think it would contain yeast. I don’t do any yeastless bread baking so I’m not much help.

    Wishing you all the best on your new dietary adventure!

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Karen

    posted on November 18, 2011 at 2:57 pm

    Hi

    I have been making my starter for a few days and am properly excited lol Just wondering, what is the function of palm sugar. I don’t take in any sugars or sweeteners at all, except some fruit like maybe applesauce, do you think this would work?

    Thanks!

    karen

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Karen, It helps activate the yeast. Is your starter getting nice and bubbly?

    [Reply]

    Karen Reply:

    It is getting a little bubbly. I have noticed it getting more bubbly when I use gram flour. I was reading another blog about sourdough starters and the writer said they use a combination of flours throughout the sourdough process that they will be using in their bread.

    @Amy,

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Then it’s probably working. The coconut palm sugar just gives the yeast a food source.

  • Carmen Tellez

    posted on December 24, 2011 at 3:29 am

    Dear Amy:
    Help, please!!
    As you know I have been gluten free since early 2004, cook mostly gluten free, no wheat, oats, etc. Tired of eating corn tortillas with just about everything, but when I read about Sourdough Gluten Free Bread on your site, I remembered a gluten free Sourdough starter in fridge, yes, its alive & I’m more than ready to bake our own bread, you recommend Amys but in my pantry found a brand new package of Bob’s Red Mill Wonderful bread, could I supplement Bob’s Red Mill for Amy’s, do I make any changes?
    PS Looking forward to the pumpkin empanadas soon, yummy!
    Sincerely,
    Carmen

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Carmen Tellez, My suggestion is to try it and see how it works. The flour blend I recommend is one that I came up with after some experimentation. If you click the link it will take you to the recipe so you can make it at home.

    [Reply]

  • Carmen Tellez

    posted on December 24, 2011 at 5:05 am

    Amy:
    Got brave enough, fed starter yesterday, let it sat on counter about 45 minutes & to my joy it was bubbling, my baby is alive & well. Will follow instructions carefully, look forward to enjoying home baked bread & to share outcome with you.
    Gracias, mi amiga Amy.
    Thanks, my friend Amy

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Carmen Tellez, Have fun!! I love baking with sourdough starter.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Melissa

    posted on January 8, 2012 at 4:17 pm

    Have got my starter going great and am sitting here waiting for the loaf in the oven to get done! the first loaf looks amazing. I was having trouble using my hand mixer so after getting the first batch rising I ran to the store to get a stand mixer. I have now made a second batch and it is in its first rising. Now for my question, the first loaf looked like I expected, nice and doughy. the second batch was very dry and crumbly looking. What did I do wrong? Also I can use this recipe to make cinnnamon bread or maybe rosemary bread?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Melissa, If the first batch looked really good and the second batch didn’t, you did something different. Sounds like you left out some liquid – like not enough water. Sure – add spices and flavorings to your heart’s content.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Michelle

    posted on January 17, 2012 at 3:55 pm

    I made this bread, but did the following as a egg substitute, to try it. I used tapioca starch instead of eggs. Soften about 1 tbsp tapioca starch in 1/3 cup warm water for each egg. This will be the same consistency as an egg. My bread turned out so wonderful & tasty! And is now Vegan, as I have a few Vegan friends! :D Thank you for posting this recipe! I quite enjoyed my first AMAZING sandwich, since being diagnosed with a gluten allergy 6 yrs ago!! Thank you thank you!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Michelle, Yea for amazing sandwiches!!

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Melissa

    posted on January 19, 2012 at 7:23 am

    Ok, have made my wonderful loaf bread and and am now wondering, do I need to feed it a certain number of times before taking more out and making another loaf? Do I need to feed it 3-5 times like I did at the beginning?

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Melissa, Go back and look at the sourdough starter post – you continue to feed it normally. Daily if it’s not in the fridge; 3 times a week if it’s refrigerated.

    So glad you like the bread!!

    [Reply]

  • Meran

    posted on January 23, 2012 at 1:10 pm

    Yes, I agree, this is the best looking loaf I’ve seen yet for GF sourdough, besides a few of my own;)
    Will be subscribing to your blog, to track your process and see if I can duplicate your efforts.
    I’ve been a scratch cook all my life, and a bread maker for 40 yrs. This GF bread is tough! I’m trying NOT to re-invent the wheel; sometimes that even works ;)
    Meran

    [Reply]

  • Meran

    posted on January 24, 2012 at 6:55 pm

    So, my palm sugar is solid, either in cakes or a plastic jar. Is there a special trick to using it? Do I melt it first? Grate it? (if so, how do I get it out of the jar?)
    Never used the stuff before…..
    Thanks.
    Meran
    Ps. It’s tasty ;)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Meran, I don’t use solid palm sugar. I buy the granulated kind. I think you can grate it on a box grater, though.

    [Reply]

  • Nichole

    posted on January 24, 2012 at 7:20 pm

    I don’t use canola oil, can I use another kind of oil instead? Thanks so much.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Nichole, Sure – use any oil you choose.

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    posted on February 7, 2012 at 6:38 pm

    Trying mine now and SO nervous! My dough is about to rise and it seems really wet.

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie

    posted on February 7, 2012 at 8:41 pm

    Please help!!! I started my sourdough a few days ago and it’s doing great. However….. I just mixed up the bread recipe and it looks like batter. I mixed up a GF bread recipe according to the recipe on another website and had the same problem. I’m new to GF baking, but certainly not new to the kitchen. Is there a secret way to weigh out the water that I don’t know about? I did the 300 grams. I’m getting really discouraged.
    Thank you!
    Stephanie

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    @Stephanie, PS I went ahead and did the first rise time and beat it again. Then I poured it into my pan. After zeroing the scale with the pan I weighed my final product and it was only 4g off the sum of the recipe ingredients. So I didn’t miss anything. Do I just need to do less water? Why wouldn’t it work the same?

    [Reply]

    Stephanie Reply:

    @Stephanie, K, I just made this again and I left out some water and it’s STILL not dough like. Any suggestions???

    [Reply]

    Lisa Reply:

    @Stephanie,
    I read on a different gluten free blog that gluten free bread dough is like cake batter and not to worry. I have made this bread once and am making it again in the next day or so. It was the best GF bread I have made yet. Light, airy, fluffy, etc. I really enjoyed it.

  • Laura

    posted on February 13, 2012 at 7:52 pm

    I love this recipe. I did convert it to cups, teaspoons and tablespoons and it still turned out great. I half filled two small loaf pans and let it rise to over the top and it had a great texture with HOLES. smile

    For those who are concerned that it is more batter-like than dough-like, I think that is just how it is supposed to be. Mine is like cake batter.

    I was wondering if anyone has varied the flours in Amy’s blend? I am out of garbanzo bean flour but have quinoa and barley. Does anyone know if that would work? The second time I made this, I used 1/3 rice flour with 2/3 Amy’s and it turned out even better than the first time. But not sure – that bean flour may be necessary.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    @Laura, I used sorghum and buckwheat and it turned out deliciously. Since both of those flours are more absorbing, though, I did need to increase the water a little.

    [Reply]

  • Meran

    posted on February 13, 2012 at 8:24 pm

    Laura, barley is NOT gluten free; were you aware of that?

    Also, would it be okay to post your measurement conversions?

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    @Meran, No I wasn’t aware. I am only gluten sensitive, not allergic, so it doesn’t seem to bother me but I don’t use barley often. I’m not even sure if it is gluten that bothers me but I do know that wheat does. So I am more on a wheat-free diet than gluten free.

    I need to revise my comments above regarding the thickness of the dough and my measurements. I have made this bread 3 times. I had the conversions on the print-out for the first two batches that turned out so well. That dough was thicker than cake batter, thick enough to mound but not to shape like regular bread dough. Then I lost that sheet and printed a new one and worked out the measurements again. The last time, I don’t know all that was different but it did come out quite different, like cake batter, but the bread did not rise like the others (maybe I should have waited longer)and I got what I would call 2 small half-loaves only half a pan high. So until I try it more successfully again, I should wait to give my conversions. There are many conversion programs on the internet you can use.

    [Reply]

  • Lori

    posted on February 21, 2012 at 1:10 pm

    If anyone has made this into sourdough rolls/buns, I would be very interested in your technique! The bread is amazing!!! Have also made amazing waffles out of the starter.

    [Reply]

    Lori Reply:

    @Lori, I just used this recipe for buns and they turned out great! I just replaced the eggs with water (115 grams), added some sesame and poppy seeds, divided the dough into 10 rolls and let it rest for an hour. I baked them for 21 minutes at 400 degrees. WOW!!!

    [Reply]

  • Laura

    posted on March 3, 2012 at 2:04 pm

    I made my fourth loaf and this time using new conversion measurements. My loaf turned out very nicely but I didn’t get the two loaves like I did before, just one. I am kind of heartbroken that I lost that recipe. Here are my conversions used last time: 1/3 c. starter, 1 1/4 c. water, 2 eggs, 1/4 c. oil, 1 tsp. vinegar, 2 3/4 c. flour mix, 1 T sugar, 3 tsp. xanthan gum, 1 tsp. yeast, 1 tsp salt. This batter is scoopable, not pourable – thicker than cake batter, but not elastic and moldable like regular bread dough.

    [Reply]

  • Sarah Butcher

    posted on March 13, 2012 at 12:46 pm

    Will this work w/o the Xanthan gum? I can’t use the gums w/o getting sick.

    [Reply]

  • Carmen Tellez

    posted on March 28, 2012 at 2:55 am

    Amy:
    Been gluten/wheat free since 2004, been making quick breads, biscuits, etc. Begin a GF sourdough starter 6/2011, I made it with brown rice flour, she’s doing great, alive & bubbly.
    Looking forward to making MY first GF sourdough bread recipe. yours.
    Could I use my own GF blend instead of store bought ?,
    recipe from Bette Hagman’s “The gluten-free gourmet”, her GF blend is
    2 c rice flour
    2/3 potato starch flour
    1/3 tapioca flour

    I always add small amount Xanthan Gun per cup of GF flour blend, so bread won’t turn into bricks.
    Both myself & adult son with food allergies/Autism are doing much better Gluten Free.
    My gratitude in helping make transition easier/tastier.
    Carmen

    [Reply]

  • Sarah

    posted on June 2, 2012 at 7:38 pm

    Hi Amy
    I’ve successfully made your sourdough starter and I’m very happy with it :).
    I’d like to attempt this loaf of bread but I don’t have any apple cider vinegar. Do you know if regular white, white wine or red wine vinegars would be ok?
    x

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sarah, You can try it – I can’t see why it wouldn’t work. I haven’t tested it though so I can’t make any promises. Let me know how it turns out.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • BETH

    posted on July 5, 2012 at 11:54 pm

    I JUST MADE THIS BREAD THIS MORNING AND HAD SOME QUESTIONS.
    1. IS THE DOUGH AND THE STARTER SUPPOSED TO HAVE A CONSISTENCY CLOSE TO CAKE BATTER?
    2. EVERYTHING WENT FINE UNTIL I BAKED THE BREAD AND THEN IT SANK IN THE MIDDLE. IT LOOKED LIKE A CRATER. DO YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS. I USED BROWN RICE INSTEAD OF SORGHUM AND STEVIA INSTEAD OF PALM SUGAR (SINCE MY MOM IS SENSITIVE TO ALL PROCESSED SUGAR) AND INSTEAD OF XANTHAN GUM USED GUAR GUM (IT WAS THE ONLY THING AVAILABLE).
    3. MY MOM SAYS THE TASTE IS GREAT. SHE SAID TO SAY THANK YOU FOR THIS WEBSITE BECAUSE IT MAKES TRYING TO FIND RECIPES TO COOK FOR US EASIER.
    PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THERE IS SOMETHING THAT I NEED TO DO DIFFERENT.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @BETH, If you change the recipe, you are going to get different results. Brown rice is much different than sorghum. Your yeast might need longer to rise if you don’t use any coconut palm sugar.

    Please tell your mom I said THANK YOU! It’s so nice that she enjoys my site.

    Hugs!

    [Reply]

  • Ashley

    posted on July 24, 2012 at 11:08 pm

    Can something be substituted for eggs, I have a severe allergy :/ and a gluten issue?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ashley, Have you tried Ener-G egg replacer? Or a flax egg? They both should work well.

    [Reply]

  • Christina

    posted on October 3, 2012 at 7:21 pm

    Is it OK to use someone else’s gluten free sourdough starter from brown rice to activate your flour blend? I sent away for the dried one someone gives away online. Also can I use palm oil or ghee in place of canola? I try not to do the high omega 6 oils.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christina, You can try it and see how it works out. Would love to know what happens…please report back!

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • diana

    posted on December 28, 2012 at 6:03 am

    just made my sourdough starter – can’t wait to try it out, tks very much

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @diana, Let me know how it turns out, Diana!

    [Reply]

  • Peggy Jacobi

    posted on January 11, 2014 at 11:45 am

    It does not look like you could make this in a bread maker. Is this correct?

    [Reply]

  • Nahida Tabassum

    posted on March 30, 2014 at 12:42 pm

    Hi. what is the role of vinegar in bread? I made bread from wheat starch for PKU patient. can i use vinegar? my starter is 15g of all purpose flour, 3g of yeast ang 30g of water. rest is wheat starch and ofcourse no egg. Please suggest. I help PKU patients with there diet.

    Regards.

    [Reply]

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