• Iris

    posted on May 18, 2010 at 9:07 pm

    That’s the method I use too! It really does work every time!

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  • Jen

    posted on May 18, 2010 at 9:34 pm

    I read 17 minutes. It’s been working pretty well for me, but one time I did not check them and found soft boiled eggs later. What could I do with them? I wound up throwing them away, but it was so wasteful

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  • abbie

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 6:51 am

    I usually do the same thing but with 13 minutes on the timer. And yup, it works every time. :)

    How do you successfully peel eggs that just don’t want to let go of their shell? Is it true that these are the fresher eggs?

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  • Aubree Cherie

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 9:14 am

    I’ll definitely be trying this. I eat at least one hard boiled egg each day and so every week I cook a lot of them! I’ve honestly never thought about it, i just threw them in a pot with cold water and let them boil for 10 minutes. I’d love to have them looking like yours though! Thanks for posting about it! :)

    ~Aubree Cherie

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    Amy Reply:

    @Aubree Cherie, I didn’t think about it either until someone taught me how to do it. My mom always threw them in a pot and boiled them for 20 minutes. I’m sure she learned how to do that from her mom.

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  • JenE

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 11:41 am

    Thanks for this post!
    We like to steam our eggs. The yolks come out fluffy and the whites are less “rubbery”. We use a bamboo steamer and steam the eggs for about 15 min depending on the size of the egg. I also found out that a tiny prick (through the shell, but not through the inner membrane) at the fat end of the egg helps to keep the shell from cracking. I use the pointed end of a corn-on-the-cob holder for this. Also makes for fluffy filling for deviled eggs.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @JenE, I’ve never steamed an egg but will have to try it out. The yolks on the eggs I cook are really nice and not rubbery – it seems overcooked eggs have a rubbery quality. It’ll be interesting to see the difference between the two methods.

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  • Alta

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 12:18 pm

    Beautiful egg! I use a similar method (which reminds me, I should update my blog post from long ago about this) – I bring to nearly a boil – lots of bubbles coming up, but no rolling boil or big bubbles, reduce to low, cover, and cook for 10 1/2 minutes. Then I plunge into the ice bath where they usually stay for 20-30 minutes, or whenever I remember them. I usually use older eggs for this so they peel more easily. Also, I’ve learned not to do more than about 8 at a time – it seems my bowl for the ice bath isn’t large enough to accommodate more eggs, and the warmth of the eggs warms up the ice bath too much, resulting in harder to peel eggs.

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  • Melody

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 12:46 pm

    Amy,

    I consider myself a good cook. I can add things to recipes, take away….but boiling eggs…I have to Google it! These eggs are perfection! We’ll be having a little egg salad for dinner!

    Thanks!
    Melody

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  • Karen@Cook4Seasons

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 1:36 pm

    Those ARE stunning! It’s probably preference, but I’m with Abbie – 13 minutes are perfect for me.

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  • Jen

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 1:53 pm

    When I was working on Jacques Pépin’s show he taught me the same method but only 5 minutes. My eggs are always perfect, I wonder what 12 min would do? Also he taught me how to release the sulfur smell and air pocket that you can get, making the egg uneven. Prick the narrow end with a push pin before cooking. This allows the gas to escape making peeling less smelly.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jen, I have no idea what the time difference is about. I will have to try 5 minutes and see what I think.

    Each chef has a method that works for them – my last chef instructor said that poking holes in the eggs is a waste of time and makes no difference in the final product. Each person has to try different methods to see what works for them.

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  • jamie

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 2:41 pm

    i love this method too! Cook’s Illustrated does the same method and i have used it ever since! i also do poke thru the shell &they peel perfectly. and yes, fresher eggs are harder to peel (i <3 my farmer's market)so if you are getting fresh eggs, let them sit for a week or so, then hard boil them. and to answer Amy's question-i do read between the lines, just because i have been cooking since i was young. most of the time it comes out great- however, sometimes i really should have paid more attention to whatever new method, since my just cooking from habit didn't do that dish any favors.

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  • Jessica

    posted on May 19, 2010 at 3:14 pm

    Great minds think alike! I actually had written a post on how to hard boil eggs but since we use the same method, I’ll just link to yours instead of posting it :) haha! too funny!

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    Amy Reply:

    @Jessica, Please publish your post. No one owns the rights to boiling eggs – nothing bothers me more than bloggers who think that because they posted it, they own it.

    Honestly – who really invented the pancake, the cupcake, bread, and scrambled eggs? My thoughts are mine and the stories that go with my food are mine, but I take no credit for how to boil an egg. Please post your method and share your story. I’m sure it’s fabulous.

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  • Zoe @ Z's Cup of Tea

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 2:20 am

    When I saw your picture of those eggs on Flickr, I was blown away! The yellow of the yolks are so vibrant! I’ll try this way next when I make some hard boiled eggs and will take pictures. :)

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    Zoe @ Z's Cup of Tea Reply:

    @Zoe @ Z’s Cup of Tea, *is so vibrant – correcting my grammar. :)

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  • Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 9:26 am

    I am so glad that you wrote this post. Someone taught me a long time ago how to do this, and I forgot. Thanks, Amy!

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  • Emilee

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 10:47 am

    Pretty much what I do, but I never crack open an egg, they are always perfect each time.

    I just put the egg in the pan, turn it on and set timer for 20 minutes, once it boils turn it off and put a lid on until the timer goes off, and then rinse in cool water. Took me a bit to remember this but now it’s how I always do it. I think I learned it from allrecipes.com, perfect eggs.

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  • Winnie

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 10:54 am

    I love perfect hard boiled eggs. I do mine exactly the same…well, almost. As my grandma taught me. But I do 15 minutes and don’t do the ice bath…will try it “your way” next time ;)

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  • Traci

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 11:15 am

    I do it a bit differently, but have great success with perfect eggs as well. Although I think your method may suit me better.
    I boil the water first, then put the eggs in the boiling water for 6 minutes. Turn the water off, then put them immediately in cold water. Works great every time… but I will be trying your method.

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  • Tracee

    posted on May 20, 2010 at 12:12 pm

    I was so happy when I could finally make hard boiled eggs without the green on the yolks. My method is very similar to yours, I usually set the timer to 11 min.

    I like what you say about reading between the lines. I will usually look at different recipes for the same thing to see the different tips I can pick up.

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  • carrie

    posted on May 23, 2010 at 1:04 pm

    It took me a long time to learn how to make really good boiled eggs! This is a lovely tutorial and you are right, simple but good methods nearly always result in a really good outcome! :-) I’m jealous of your culinary school experiences! i hope to go someday!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @carrie, You would love culinary school, Carrie. It’s hard work but so very rewarding. I’m always amazed that at the end of each class I come out feeling like I know even less than I did before I started – not because I didn’t learn anything but because I’m so grossly aware of how much more I don’t know.

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  • Darlene

    posted on July 8, 2011 at 12:19 pm

    The green on the egg is a result of letting the egg cool down. It will be eliminated BECAUSE of the ice water bath. I learned this from my mother years ago and it works every time. If I don’t leave them in the ice water bath long enough, I will get a tinge of green around the yolk. So the longer the better. The idea is to keep the eggs in the ice water bath until they have completely cooled down.

    Another trick my mother taught me to avoid cracked eggs during the boiling process is to put a terry towel (dish sized is fine) in the bottom of the pot before putting the eggs in, then put your water in and boil away. The towel cushions the eggs and no cracked eggs result. I have used this method every Easter when boiling eggs (up to 2 dozen can be boiled in this method in one pot without any eggs cracking – I use a big pot and a bath towel when boiling a large number of eggs) and always have beautiful boiled eggs. Again don’t forget the ice bath. For 2 dozen eggs, I use the sink for the ice water bath. It’s large enough to cover the eggs easily so they all end up like Amy’s. Beautiful eggs! :)

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  • Katie

    posted on August 5, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    Another tip to make sure that the yoke is centered especially to make pretty deviled eggs. Place the carton of eggs on its side for a day. The yolk will then center itself so you have it directly in the middle of the white.

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  • Ari @ The Frugally Rich Life

    posted on August 27, 2011 at 10:11 am

    Amy- When you say bring to a boil do you mean a rolling boil or just when you start to see bubbles? I think when I get to a rolling boil it’s too long….

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ari @ The Frugally Rich Life, Rolling boil means a full boil. :)

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  • Stephanie

    posted on February 28, 2012 at 12:34 am

    The way I was taught to center the yolk (again, good for pretty hard boiled eggs) is to shake each egg before boiling. Also, the older the egg, the better the hard boiled egg will turn out.

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  • shalom

    posted on March 2, 2012 at 1:28 pm

    About soft boiled eggs – I eat them a lot because they require very little attention while cooking and they taste like an over-easy fried egg, but without the fat (butter can be added to the warm cooked egg if desired). I cover the eggs with cold tap water turn the heat on high and set a timer for 10 minutes. I experimented until I came up with that time.

    For hard boiled eggs, my Home Ec teacher said to cover the eggs with cold water and cook on high. When the water starts boiling (just past the tiny bubbles) set a timer for 10 minutes. When done pour the hot water out and fill the pan with cold tap water. I have done this for many years and the eggs have always been done with no dark rings around the yolks. I think if the timer was set when the cooking started it would be around 17 minutes total – I haven’t tested this to be sure. She also said to always start eggs in cold not warm or hot water.

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  • Christina

    posted on May 16, 2012 at 2:41 am

    This is awesome! I wil try this next time. BUT one question, is it because I buymy eggs from walmart that I have such a HARD time peeling them?!?! I GET SO IRRITATED when it takes half the egg with the the shell pieces! So frustrating!!! :(

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christina, I don’t know why – I do know that fresh eggs are harder to peel than old eggs.

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    Cyrvy Christina in Colorado Reply:

    @Amy, So maybe when I buy my eggs, wait a week and then boil some? Thanks! Haha :)

    [Reply]

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