• Chef B

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 4:14 pm

    Fava bean, soy bean, pea, garbanzo bean all used to boost protien to gluten breads, why not use them in gluten free?
    Sweeteners like fig paste, prune paste and raisin paste used as well.
    There is so much to work with!
    Great post and beautiful bread Amy!

    [Reply]

    Karen@Cook4Seasons Reply:

    Oh, I love the idea of fruit pastes for sweeteners…thanks, Chef B!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Chef B, I totally agree – and love fruit pastes, too. :) Thanks for the compliment, Chef!

    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kathy G.

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 4:49 pm

    That bread looks wonderful. I will have to find a store near me that carries those ingredients. Thanks so much.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kathy G., You can order all of it at Amazon.com or iHerb.com. :)

    [Reply]

  • sommer

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 6:05 pm

    Would this work in a bread machine?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @sommer, I don’t know…you’d have to try it. It would have to be on a quick bake cycle because this bread just rises once and then it baked.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Tawra@Living On A Dime

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 8:36 pm

    I will have to try this. I have a 4 OR 5 bags of Garbanzo bean flour that I was wondering what to do with. So am I right in reading the way you flour blend works that I can use all garbanzo bean flour for it if I don’t have the fava?

    I got it to make hummus for hubby who only eats it with Pita chips but now is off wheat too so he won’t touch it with anything else.
    It looks great!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Tawra@Living On A Dime, Garbanzo-fava is a mix made by Bob’s Red Mill. It comes in a bag already blended. I’ve never tried this recipe with garbanzo bean flour so I can’t guarantee it will work but I think it will.

    [Reply]

  • Becky D

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 9:37 pm

    Have everything in place to make this tomorrow morning (Snow Day again tomorrow – YEA!).

    Thank you Thank you for a bread recipe w/o Rice flour! And for having everything in grams too.
    LOVE it! Can’t wait to make it!

    [Reply]

  • Susan

    posted on February 2, 2011 at 11:07 pm

    Amy! This looks insanely good! My husband has been pinching me to make a bread instead of spending 5 dollars a loaf on Udi’s. I think this will be the one I make next. All others I’ve tried have failed MISERABLEY and tasted awful.

    Question, I am pretty sure I can, but want to ask you anyway, can I substitute ANY oil in place of the Canola? I’m not a canola oil fan.

    Thanks! You are the best!
    Susan

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Susan, Use any neutral flavored oil. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Annette

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 12:03 am

    Wow! Amy that bread looks delicious! I love that it’s dairy free too. I will be making this! Thanks for a great looking recipe and wonderful tips! I’ve added lava bean flour to my grocery list.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Annette, It’s Bob’s Red Mill Garbanzo-Fava Bean Flour Mix. You can order it at Amazon.com and get a great price. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Annette Reply:

    @Amy, I made this bread today it’s delicious! I haven’t made it to the store yet so I used what flours I had which were: brown rice, chickpea, millet and tapioca. The millet is a string flavor so I only used 1/4 cup. I was a bit worried the batter was to wet but I trust your recipes and once again perfection. I can’t wait for Eli to try some in the morning. Thanks for sharing your talent. I can’t wait for your book!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Annette, I do think it’s the bean flour that gives more structure…the other breads I’ve made without bean flour don’t turn out quite as well. :) Glad to know you were able to use some other flours and it still worked.

    Hugs,
    Amy

  • Jeanine

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 6:33 am

    That is one fantastic looking loaf of bread, Amy! Never thought to proof in a plastic box, what a neat idea!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeanine, I learn some neat tricks at school. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Jeanine Reply:

    @Amy, And I’m glad that you’re teaching all of us. Lucky us. :)

    [Reply]

  • kristen

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 9:09 am

    Looks wonderful, can’t wait to try it. Though, we don’t use canola oil (encourage you to do some research on it). Can I use EVOO instead…?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Becky D Reply:

    @kristen, Kristen, I have a loaf rising right now, made with olive oil, I”ll let you know how it works, but I can’t imagine that it would be any different. I never even think about it any more, I always just sub olive or another oil for canola.

    [Reply]

  • Mary

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 9:16 am

    One quick question…if the G/F flour blend you are using already includes Xanthum Gum, will it be necessary to add the additional you mention in this recipe? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Mary, I think this works because I use a specific flour blend – follow the link in the recipe. If you sub another flour blend I am not sure it will have the same structure. I can’t tell you how to handle the xanthan gum, either, because the amount of xanthan gum can vary based on the type of flour you’re using.

    hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Sophie

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 10:10 am

    This does look flawless, Amy! I want to try it. I’ve been on a huge bread kick lately :) .

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sophie, You’re the bread baking guru, Sophie. If you’re impressed, I’m honored. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Lisa

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 12:17 pm

    Can I make this “yeast free”?

    [Reply]

  • Nance

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 12:34 pm

    Quick question…would this be acceptable on an anti-candida diet?

    [Reply]

  • Alta

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 12:47 pm

    Amy,this looks so great. I am impressed!

    [Reply]

  • Maggie

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    Yay Amy! This looks like great bread. We’re having company for supper on Saturday night and I just might make this for me. As it stands, I’m already making your minestrone soup. I will use flax eggs instead of eggs so if I do get to it I will definitely report back! Love the school tips :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Maggie, Thanks for being my egg-free recipe tester. :) Much love, my friend!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Sandy

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 1:24 pm

    Do you think this bread could be made w/out the egg-whites, to which I am allergic too?

    Also, a question for all those gluten allergic people out there: Have you found a shampoo/conditioner that works for you? Most of these products have wheat, or dairy in them and I have a reaction to them. Any ideas?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sandy, I have never made bread with Ener-g Egg Replacer but I have used it in cookies and it works great. I think it would work here. It’s at least worth a try.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Anna@GreenTalk

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 2:12 pm

    What is proofing plastic mean and do I have to store the bread in plastic?

    I am on a not plastic kick these days.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Anna@GreenTalk, The plastic box creates a warm, humid environment for the bread to rise. I’ve covered it before but the soft dough sticks to whatever I cover it with and ruins the loaf. If you have something else that you can put it in where air won’t get to it, it should work.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Ariana Anderson@ The Frugally Rich Life Reply:

    @Amy,
    Amy,
    This looks so delicious! I can’t wait to make it! I just made a double batch of your flour mix since it looks like it wouldn’t be quite 3 cups without doubling. I just realized I don’t have the time to make it right now, but will hopefully make it tonight! It looks great! One question: When you poof it in your box, do you put water in the box too? I know some people poof it by surrounding the pan with warm water but I couldn’t tell by the pictures. I’m guessing not. I’m going to have to look for a box like that too or if not I’ll just try and keep it warm. Oh, one more question: Will quick rise yeast work or should I just use the regular kind? Thanks! Ari

    [Reply]

  • Jasmine

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 2:42 pm

    Can I put this in my breadmaker?

    [Reply]

  • Becky D

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    Yum! Yum! Yum! Yum!

    I just ate my first slice – slathered with real butter. :)

    Thank you so much Amy! Consider this a great big huge HUG of gratefulness! I have attempted so many loaves of GF bread – and this is the only one that has been a keeper! (seriously – I’ve ended up throwing most of them away, because I knew we wouldn’t want to waste our carbs on yucky bread!)

    Oh – and I used olive oil instead of canola, but that was the only change I made to the recipe. (except that I use Celtic Sea Salt in place of the kosher salt…)

    I can’t wait for dinner so I can have some more! First time I’ve ever said that about GF bread! It’s always just been a vehicle for the toppings, but this bread can stand alone!

    Thanks again!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Becky D, Hooray!! Thanks for sharing that! I love how the garbanzo-fava flour adds structure and the top is almost crusty like real artisan bread.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Becky D Reply:

    @Amy, I know I’m gushing…but we just had dinner, and I can’t tell you how wonderful it is to have my little guy (who is GF/SF) and my big guy (who eats both sugar & gluten) both ask if there is more bread. We’ve eaten half a loaf already!

    I love the crusty top…but what I love even more is that it’s the first GF bread I’ve made that doesn’t feel like a brick when I pick it up! It’s light and airy, but with a great sandwich bread structure.
    Okay – I’ll quit gushing now….but once again, thank you SO much!

    [Reply]

  • Peter Bronski

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 3:07 pm

    Hi Amy… The bread looks gorgeous! In some respects it reminds me of my own quest to develop a “perfect” loaf of gluten-free yeast bread. You can see a decidedly UNsuccessful attempt here:

    http://noglutennoproblem.blogspot.com/2010/05/bread-bomb_18.html

    As well as the much more successful finished product here:

    http://noglutennoproblem.blogspot.com/2010/06/friday-foto-sandwich-bread.html

    I like that your version is dairy- and refined-sugar-free, which ours is not. How would you describe the flavor of the bread? And the texture/crumb?

    Cheers, Pete

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Peter Bronski, The bread has a mild flavor so it will work great as sandwich bread – it’s not overpowering at all. It’s also great for dipping in a hot bowl of soup. And toasting, too. (We’ve been having fun with this bread….)

    It’s a little crusty and has a fine crumb – it’s not at all like a crusty, wheat artisan bread but more like a good slicing sandwich bread.

    Not at all crumbly. :) I’ve got to give your bread a try.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 3:10 pm

    Looks so gorgeous Amy, congrats! I’m really looking forward to your new book too. You must be so excited! -Ali :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen, Thanks, Ali! Yes, I’m excited. Just got the first copy today. I heard that you’re working on book #2…can’t wait for that. Your first book is incredible.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Karen@Cook4Seasons

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    Once again, Amy, you have succeeded in luring me back to the baking table with this enticing creation! Just yesterday I posted one of my favorite – easy – GF bread recipes, but didn’t quite capture the beauty in my pictures as you have. I’ve been leery of the bean flours because when I’ve tried them in sweet baked goods they have imparted that flavor, but I’m willing to try it again with this bread. Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Karen@Cook4Seasons, I **love** bean flours, especially when mixed with other flours. The garbanzo-fava bean flour mix by Bob’s is pretty mild.

    Have fun!

    Hugs!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Jeff

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 4:39 pm

    Has anyone made this at altitude? We are about 8,500 ft, and was wondering what adjustments to make.

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Laura Reply:

    @Jeff, I live in Denver which is the “Mile High” city and I cooked the Sourdough Sandwich bread, which is very similar, a little hotter (385)and for 55 minutes. Worked well.

    [Reply]

  • Christianne

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 5:36 pm

    I have never baked bread in my life (except corn bread). This should be fun.
    I do not have a standing mixer but I have an eleven cup cuisinart with a bread attachment. Do you know if I can use this successfully?
    Also I am not sure about the proofing. I looked up the definition and I do understand it however I am a bit confused about the plastic box, which i have.
    Do I put the bread in the plastic bin, cover it and put it in the oven? (turned off of course)
    I am sure this is clear to everyone else but being a bread baking ingenue I am a bit timid.
    Thanks Amy. I have been wanting to bake bread but don’t have a bread machine and my favorite sandwhich bread Udi’s gets a bit $$ with 2 of us enjoying it almost everyday.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christianne, Proofing just means letting it rise. No, **do not** put the plastic box in the oven. Just put it out at room temperature. When bread rises (or is proofed) it needs to be in a warm environment. Putting in a plastic box keeps the bread covered and traps any moisture so there’s a little humidity in there too.

    Thanks for pointing out that I used “proofed” instead of “rising” – I guess I am so used to talking in ‘school terms’ that I didn’t realize that I might confuse you guys. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Christianne Reply:

    @Amy,

    Thanks Amy! I hope you had a good laugh…i did feel a bit silly about the plastic and the oven.
    Do you think the cuisnart will work to knead the dough?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christianne, When you say 11 Cup Cuisinart with a bread attachment I’m not sure what you mean…like a stand mixer that holds 11 cups? I use a whip (whisk) attachment for this…it doesn’t knead like wheat dough. It’s more like a cake batter. Do you have a whisk attachment?

    Christianne Reply:

    @Christianne,

    I have a cuisinart hand mixer with a whisk attachement.
    My cuisnart food processor has a dough “blade” which i guess is good for wheat dough? Like i said I have never baked yeast bread of any kind.
    I’m guessing the hand mixer with the whisk will be best.
    I will give it a whirl and let you know!

    Again thanks for all the help and clarifications! You are so giving and you definately ROCK!

  • cheryl harris

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 6:01 pm

    That looks absolutely beautiful. Can’t wait to try it!

    [Reply]

  • Stacey

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 6:21 pm

    I don’t have a standing mixer. Can this be made with a hand mixer or cuisinart? Have you ever tried to make the bread without yeast?
    thank you!

    [Reply]

  • The Healthy Apple

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 7:36 pm

    Looks delicious, Amy; a perfect gluten-free loaf for a cold, winter night…I’m going to create this recipe over the weekend with some fresh jam and Greek yogurt. Thank you for sharing.
    xo
    Aims

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @The Healthy Apple, Have fun…I love the flavor combo of jam & Greek yogurt. Might have to spread that on toast in the morning.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Katie

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 8:49 pm

    Amy,

    Do you have your flour blend recipe done by weight? I would love to make a bigger batch like 5-10lbs at a time. We are a larger family and it saves me a lot of time if I can make 10lbs. at a time. Plus I find I get better results when the “flours” are weighed.
    Katie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Katie, This is from the flour blend in my book…I think it makes about 3 – 3 1/2 pounds.

    Here it is:

    Garbanzo-Fava Flour 480 grams
    Sorghum Flour 452 grams
    Potato Starch 324 grams
    Tapioca Starch 156 grams

    Have fun!!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Katrina (gluten free gidget)

    posted on February 4, 2011 at 5:22 am

    Maaaaaaan that’s pretty!

    [Reply]

  • angel

    posted on February 9, 2011 at 8:10 am

    I tried the bread recipe and I’m having trouble. It seems all the gluten free, egg-free breads I make don’t cook in the middle. I thought it was a problem with the yeast, but I proofed the yeast this time and it was good. Could it be a problem with the mixing if I’m not using a good mixer with paddle attachment? I’ve just been mixing it using an electric mixer with the beaters attached. I used flax seed and water to substitute for the eggs, that’s the only change I made. Also, even though I proofed the yeast and it was good, my bread really didn’t rise.

    [Reply]

  • Mel

    posted on February 9, 2011 at 9:40 am

    I’ve never made bread in my life. Not attempted it. Little scared by it.

    Having switched to g-free 6 months ago and s-free in the last month, I was forced out on a limb. Made your prefect loaf and it is indeed as perfect as all reports say!

    My honey is Italian and misses a good crispy bun. Next version I might try an egg wash on the top to make it crispier.

    Many thanks for putting yourself out there. Two in Toronto, Canada thank you!

    [Reply]

  • Kristin

    posted on February 23, 2011 at 2:24 pm

    I made this yesterday & it turned out AMAZING!!!!!!!! Not quite “perfect”, as I failed to let it cool completely, so the bottom was all scrunched, but it still tasted good, that’s for sure!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kristin, Can you explain what you mean by the bottom being all scrunched? Maybe we can figure out what happened so it comes out better next time.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kristin

    posted on February 24, 2011 at 10:44 am

    I was just impatient & wanted warm bread… I didn’t let it cool enough & sliced into it too soon. It’s my fault. I can take a picture so that you can better understand if you wish, I still have a bit of the loaf left (surprisingly!)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kristin, You can send a pic if you have one. :)

    [Reply]

    Kristin Reply:

    @Amy,

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?fbid=10150217615995227&id=801060226&aid=449953#!/photo.php?fbid=10150432604990227&set=a.10150217615995227.449953.801060226&theater

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kristin, I’ve checked twice and it says “content not found.”

  • Annie

    posted on February 24, 2011 at 11:47 am

    This looks delicious! I absolutely can’t wait to try this out. I also purchased your cook book this week, and can’t wait to put it to use for dinner tonight, as it just arrived yesterday! Having been advised to go gf/sf a few months ago, but struggling to stay on track, I’m so excited to have some realistic and delicious options – thank you so much!!

    Quick question, would I be able to substitute agave nectar for the palm sugar in this recipie?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Annie, I would use half as much because agave is liquid and palm sugar is solid.

    Thanks for ordering my book! I am excited to hear what you think.

    Have fun & big hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Simone

    posted on March 10, 2011 at 10:29 am

    Hi Amy,
    this bread looks amazing, as a newbie to bread making i’m just curious how long, approx, it takes to rise just so I don’t sit staring at the box waiting for it to rise!
    thank you

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Simone, Hi Simone – you might want to go back and look through the recipe again. It says that it takes about an hour to rise or until the bread has reached the top of the pan. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Trish

    posted on March 19, 2011 at 11:09 pm

    Amy,

    This looks amazing. I just pulled my loaf out of the oven a few minutes ago. I didn’t have any bean flour, so I mixed up buckwheat, millet, and tapioca starch until I reached the right gram weight (love grams!) It rose beautifully, smells delicious, and actually sounds hollow (so it’s probably not a big ball of goo inside like some loaves I’ve made.) I can’t wait to try it with dinner tonight.

    Thanks for the great recipes :) . Have a great night!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Trish, Yea for the bread and for loving grams!! Yes, it’s so much easier to ‘play’ with your flour blend when you’re working with grams. Glad you had fun with this, Trish. And, as always, great to hear from you.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Lisa Krieger

    posted on March 22, 2011 at 1:44 pm

    I made this bread yesterday for the first time. Although I was thrilled with the rise, texture and lightness of the loaf, there was a taste I really didn’t like. Since I’ve only been gf for a month, I’m not sure which ingredient I can change to alter the taste a little. It was described as a mild tasting bread in other posts, but mine doesn’t fall in the mild taste category. Any ideas? The only thing I changed was coconut sugar for palm sugar.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Lisa Krieger, Hi Lisa – coconut & palm sugar are the same; as long as you’re not using the kind you have to grate. The brand I usually buy just changed the label to read “Coconut Palm Sugar” from “Palm Sugar.”

    I am not sure what taste you’re talking about. It doesn’t taste like wheat bread and sometimes that throws off someone new to gluten-free food.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Vincent

    posted on April 4, 2011 at 6:00 pm

    I did that bread yesterday and found the taste of the garbanzo flour too strong, a bit like in couscous. Then I realized garbanzo flour and garbanzo fava bean flour are two different types! So becareful when you are buying your flour! I guess I will have to try again soon :) Thanks Amy for those recipes!!!!

    [Reply]

  • Vincent

    posted on April 10, 2011 at 7:49 pm

    Thank you thank you thank you soooo much for this recipe! I just did it again with only Sorghum and it looks and taste delicious! You rock!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Vincent, That’s great news, Vincent. Thanks for sharing! It’s good to know.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Anna

    posted on June 3, 2011 at 4:20 pm

    I am going to have a go at making this gorgeous loaf!

    However, just a note of caution and I’m sure this doesn’t apply to 99.9% of people but to the minimum to which it applies it is very serious and potentially life threatening — I am talking about fava bean allergy. I have no idea if fava flour is a danger because it depends what parts of the bean plant go in, whether anything beyond the actual bean, but I think it’s worth noting what it says on this website:

    http://www.allallergy.net/fapaidfind.cfm?cdeoc=194

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Anna, The article says that the allergy is thought to apply to the pod lining, not the bean which is what the flour is made from, and generally restricted to Mediterranean and Chinese populations. Further, the article suggests that those it may affect those with legume allergies and those with a particular form of severe anemia called acute hemolysis, and according to this article it’s something that not all who have that form of anemia would react to. Also, it’s not one of the top 8 allergens.

    It also said that there was a clinical study in which fava beans helped those with Parkinson’s disease and I found a couple of other articles that supported that claim. My dad had Parkinson’s disease so I find that very positive.

    [Reply]

  • Andi

    posted on July 15, 2011 at 5:59 pm

    I just made this bread, and it’s baking now – looks like it’s going to turn out great, so thank you! I didn’t have quite the right mix of ingredients – basically I just threw everything I had left as far as flour into a blend, and I was definitely short on starch, but I’m still hopeful! :)

    A note about rising – I can’t remember where I found this tip, but what works REALLY well is to microwave a cup of water for 1-2 minutes, until it’s boiling, then set the bread pan in the microwave with the still-steaming water (in case it’s unclear, obviously leave the water in the cup!!) It probably works a lot like the plastic proofing box, but since I don’t have a proofing box it’s easier for me! :)

    [Reply]

  • AJ

    posted on July 26, 2011 at 6:01 pm

    Just made it with flax eggs to substitute for the eggs and it turned out great :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @AJ, Yea! Always love a good sub. Is your flax egg 1 tablespoon flax meal mixed with 3 tablespoons hot water?

    [Reply]

  • Kelly Magill

    posted on August 7, 2011 at 6:04 pm

    I am in Northern Ontario. I am trying your bread for the first time. I have made my own garfava flour from scratch and it tastes okay. What I am wanting to know is what the doughs consistency is supposed to be like before proofing? Close to read bread dough, or more like a cake batter? Or somewhere in between?

    thanx
    kel

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kelly Magill, It’s somewhere between a cake batter and a bread dough. Definitely not knead-able but thicker than a cake batter.

    [Reply]

  • ReddRunner

    posted on August 18, 2011 at 12:50 pm

    This bread is delicious (perfect, really!). I’m newly GF and so is my son, so having good bread is a god-send. I wanted to let you know that I made this in my bread machine, just to see what happened. I mixed it all according to directions above, put the wet ingredients in first, added the mixed dry on top and gently spread the dry out so it was level. Turned on the machine and let it do its work (once scraping the sides to get all the dry ingredients). The taste was spot-on but it was pretty heavy and dense. Not a bad thing, necessarily. I’ve found that with the bread machine loaf, I only used one slice of bread for a sandwich, just cut it in half and it was definitely plenty. My very picky son likes it too. Thank you for this recipe and all of the others. I have your book and have loved everything I’ve made thus far. I cannot thank you enough!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @ReddRunner, I imagine that the bread machine would produce different results…I can’t get a great loaf out of mine. So glad your son enjoys the bread. :) Always a good thing!!

    [Reply]

  • Pharmagirl

    posted on October 2, 2011 at 4:38 pm

    Amy, thank you! Since discovering that both my husband and 10 year old daughter are gluten intolerant I’ve been on the quest for an edible bread. This one is outstanding, with the same bread like texture we expect from bread and that wonderful chewiness.

    Just took it out of the oven (unfortunately shrunk slightly; next time less rising). Both husband and daughter couldn’t wait for it to cool fully so each had two slices and loved it. Finally, a bread I can be proud of. Oh, there were disasters! :)

    Next on the list is your sourdough bread. So glad I discovered your site.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Pharmagirl, Yea!!! I’m smiling ear to ear!!! Fabulous!!

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Layna Melchert

    posted on November 4, 2011 at 10:55 am

    Is there anything that I can use to replace bean flour in a recipe? I have a friend who is allergic to legumes (beans, lentils, soy), so I cannot use any of your recipes that call for the bean flour when he and his wife come over. He is ok with nuts. Any ideas?

    [Reply]

  • Richa@HobbyandMore

    posted on December 1, 2011 at 8:14 pm

    lovely bread Amy!.. i just started baking some gf stuff cookies and muffins right now.. this bread is so beautiful that i might have to give it a try!

    [Reply]

  • Jeanette

    posted on December 2, 2011 at 7:04 am

    Thanks for sharing this bread recipe – it looks like it has a really nice rise. I haven’t tried making any GF loaf breads yet, just free form.

    [Reply]

  • Jodi

    posted on December 2, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    HI Amy,

    Just popped this bread into the oven. Sure looks like bread so far!! Thanks for giving such detailed directions.

    Jodi

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jodi, Thanks for coming back to share – I love hearing reader feedback.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • gv elwert

    posted on December 5, 2011 at 11:31 am

    I just baked this bread after looking at the recipe since way before Thanksgiving and it is yummy!!! I had a tough time putting it in a bag to save for later.

    [Reply]

  • Emily

    posted on January 3, 2012 at 10:16 pm

    I made your bread today and had a few questions.

    It sank once it cooled. I did forget to cut the slices so that might have been a cause. I used your flour blend, but used more sorghum instead of the bean flour. My son is not supposed to have chickpeas. Could this also have been a cause? Do you have another suggestion for the flour blend? Also, could I do this bread in a bread maker?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Emily, Changing the flours was probably the culprit. Can your son have quinoa flour? That might work well. I’ve never tried this recipe in a bread maker – you could most certainly give it a whirl.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Emily Reply:

    I tried your suggestion with the quinoa. It was WONDERFUL! It did not sink on top or the sides. It was NOT sticky and cut beautifully. I think this loaf, by far, as been my best one…not to mention, the kids LOVED it. Im about to make several loafs to freeze. Im also going to try it in the bread maker. Thanks for your suggestion on the quinoa.

    [Reply]

  • JT

    posted on January 8, 2012 at 3:26 am

    I baked this bread and it looked absolutely gorgeous when baked, but on the palate it was very oily. The loaf is very moist, airy, light and glistening with oil. I didn’t have garbanzo fava bean flour and used chickpea flour instead. Would that have made a difference? Maybe I should have used more Sorgham flour instead of chickpea. But would like your comments as I would like to try again.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @JT, I don’t know what happened. It sounds like you used too much oil. I don’t think that garbanzo bean flour would make too much of a difference.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Casey

    posted on January 16, 2012 at 5:49 pm

    Today was my third time trying this recipe ant this time I used Sorghum flour with brown rice flour. It was more of a cake batter, and did not really rise. But when I put it in the oven to bake it “boils” over the sides and gets all over the oven floor. It does feel lighter and tastes good. I think I do like baking with the sorghum. But I am wondering about is spilling over, I think it is my pan, but the pans I have still make it more of a rectangle instead of a square.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Casey, Whenever you start changing the flours, you change the way the recipes turns out. I have never had bread spill out over the pan so I don’t know what to tell you there.

    As far as the rise, you might make sure that your yeast is alive. Google it to find out how. The other thing is to make sure it’s in a warm place. If your kitchen is cold like mine in the winter it takes longer for bread to rise.

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    @Amy,
    Hmmm, I will work on the giving the bread more time to rise. I was using Sorghum, Brown Rice with Corn Starch and Tapioca Starch. I am going to try the potato starch next time. Thank you for the tips!

    [Reply]

  • Corine

    posted on January 18, 2012 at 10:19 pm

    I made this bread today. I haven’t read all the comments so maybe the answer is there but can you tell me if the dough is supposed to be very sticky when you put it in the pan? That isn’t normal for bread dough. My was very sticky inspite of adding more floor. Also it is quite heavy when baked. Is that also normal? It tastes good though. :)

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    @Corine,

    The second time I made this bread I used extra flour in error and it did make it sticky and heavy. The last one I made was another error but it was light and moist. I have been eating sandwiches all week.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Corine, Gluten-free bread dough is much different than gluten bread dough. Your bread was heavy because you added more flour. If you follow the recipe as written it’ll be a great loaf of bread.

    [Reply]

    Casey Reply:

    @Corine,

    I just baked this again and again it is very sticky. Hard to scoop into the bread pan. It would stick to my fingers and spoon. I have read that gluten free bread dough is like a cake batter. I keep trying. :)

    [Reply]

  • Jess

    posted on January 20, 2012 at 5:12 pm

    Hi Amy!

    I recently found out that I am allergic to vinegar (massive asthma attacks), so I was wondering if you thought lemon or orange juice might work in this recipe instead of the apple cider vinegar. Please let me know when you get a chance. Thanks so much for all the wonderful recipes — I’ve made about 5 dinners from your book now and my boyfriend LOVES each of them and doesn’t miss the gluten or sugar in any way!!! I think they’re delcious too, of course! :)

    Jess =)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jess, You can just leave the vinegar out. It won’t make a big difference. So glad you’re enjoying my book. It’s so good to know…that book was a labor of love.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Beth Baker

    posted on February 8, 2012 at 11:48 am

    This looks like a great recipe. However, I react somewhat badly to Xanthan gum. Can I use guar gum instead?

    [Reply]

  • marcee

    posted on February 15, 2012 at 3:01 pm

    Made the bread this morning right after I got all my ingredients from Azure Standard. WE LOVED IT!! I ground my own sorghum too. I love that it has more WHOLE grains in it. It’s so hard to go from making 100% whole wheat bread to making “white” bread. This is a great inbetween!!

    [Reply]

  • Angela

    posted on February 20, 2012 at 10:08 am

    Hi Amy,
    I have tried many store bought gluten free breads and haven’t liked any of them. So thank you so much for this bread! I was wondering if you knew the nutritional facts for a loaf of this bread. We love it and I do mean love it. I made a loaf on a Tuesday one week and by Thursday of the same week it was gone. I have a 10 year old daugther who wants to eat it for every meal with some real butter melted on it but I am wondering about calories and fat content. Thank you for anything you can tell me.

    Angela

    [Reply]

  • Ellyn Sprissler

    posted on March 5, 2012 at 4:03 pm

    I tried making this in my bread machine since I don’t have a stand mixer or food processor. It was a disaster. I would not recommend it. Considering most everyone had better results than me, I’ll try it again in the oven.

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on March 16, 2012 at 2:34 pm

    Dear Amy: This is EXACTLY what I have been looking for. EXCEPT I am worried about using the Chia because every single time I have used the flax gel technique, my bread is majorly gummy instead . . . even after popping it back in the oven. So, no gumminess in this bread, eh? Definitely will try it once I finish what I made last week (which was one of the best breads I have baked to date, but improvement could still be done !) MY QUESTION: You say you used Amy’s Basic Flour Blend. Which one EXACTLY? There are a few so I wanna make sure I use what you used in this recipe cuz it looks just wonderful !!

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on March 16, 2012 at 2:37 pm

    I just read . . . you have a book??? . . . WHICH ONE?????? Are they vegan recipes (I love to bake) Unfortunately, I have allergy to eggs and milk too :-(

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on March 16, 2012 at 2:41 pm

    This is to Ellyn: if you dont have a stand mixer or hand mixer (I dont either), use your bread machine to do all the mix ! Then, just scoope it out of the bread machine pan and put into a regular loaf pan and put in oven.

    [Reply]

  • britt

    posted on March 31, 2012 at 4:55 pm

    i just made this….i used guar gum instead of xantham gum, stevia instead of sugar, and added 1 tsp of fruit pectin = the bread didn’t rise enough and when it cooked came out kind of sticky/gooey/not bread consistency. and it tastes like rice. i don’t know if it’s supposed to, but i wish i could just find bread that tasted like real bread.

    [Reply]

    Farzana Reply:

    Britt: Sorry to hear that it didnt work out well. The only really, really good bread that I have made to date is on allrecipes.com I am not allowed to give the URL address but its called gluten free white bread for bread machine. I omited the eggs and subsituted it with applesauce, ener-g egg replacer and added a bit of baking powder to it. I also did some other changes. Let me know if you need more info. This is seriously easy. Honestly. I mixed everything in my bread machine but put it into the oven for the actual baking/rising.

    [Reply]

    britt Reply:

    @Farzana,

    I think i found it, but it uses cornstarch and i’m allergic to corn…that’s why i used guar gum instead of xanthum. It also uses soy flour and I cant have soy…
    (I can’t have gluten, dairy, sugar, chocolate, soy, corn, peanuts)

    [Reply]

    Farzana Reply:

    Britt ! I also am allergic to corn so I used tapioca. I really like the tapioca, more than potatoe starch. The bread feels so nice and soft. I baked this bread many times. A few times WITHOUT soy flour. I used chickpea flour. Nothing changed. Its the same texture and its bean flour as is soy. Lemme know if you need any more info.This bread actualy tastes good without toasting. I bring it to work for lunch all the time. :-)

  • Lisa

    posted on April 3, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Hi Amy!
    I have a question about the Basic Flour Blend and your Perfect Bread recipe. I would like to make the bread without making a double batch of the flour blend. Your flour blend amounts to 2 2/3 c flour and the bread recipe calls for 3c of the blend. Do you have the amounts needed to increase each ingredient to make 3cups? Thank you!

    [Reply]

  • Tiffany

    posted on April 12, 2012 at 2:56 pm

    I have today (4/12/12) made your Perfect Gluten-Free Bread. I used Authentic Foods Bette’s Gourmet Four Bean Flour since it seemed to have the same ingredients as your blend. Did not have large eggs and have never purchased them before but was anxious to make the bread (I’m very TIRED of Udi’s and all others). The bread came out fantastic (with the exception that I think I let it rise a tad too long so while baking it really rose to unheard of heights). Made a note to mark the glass pan with a magic marker so I’d know when it had risen enough but not too much. I baked it on a pizza stone and did the water trick in a pan beneath. Baked for 55 minutes, cooled as suggested, and upon slicing I noticed a small sliver of unbaked “dough” on the bottom. So I have to figure that out now. I’m so glad I found your website as this is the best GF bread I’ve ever made and I’ve made a whole lot of loaves that go out to our deer herd (we live in the country) to eat and they seem to love all the failures I’ve baked. They’re not getting this one though.

    When I run out of Bette’s Four Bean Flour mix I think I’ll get the Bob’s Red Mill products and make your flour mix, as the Authentic Foods product was super expensive and besides I had to pay $15.00 to get it shipped to me. Now THAT’S prohibitive, to me anyway.

    Question: Would using large eggs have changed anything in the baking process versus the medum size eggs I used?

    Thanks so much for the recipe, I was about to give up and throw in the towel on making any GF bread that was edible.

    [Reply]

  • Jesica

    posted on May 3, 2012 at 9:18 pm

    Me and my husband are just going gluten free,sugar free and would love to try this recipe but what dose the bread taste like? Dose it have the same consistency as regular bread. I would just hate to by all the stuff to make it and hate it.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jesica, Oh Jessica! I feel your pain! It’s scary starting out, isn’t it? It’s great bread. It doesn’t taste like wheat bread but it has a great texture.

    [Reply]

  • Judy

    posted on May 11, 2012 at 10:29 am

    What setting would you use for your bread recipes for a regular bread machine and not a gluten free bread machine? thanks

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Judy, I haven’t made this recipe in a bread machine. Sorry – you’ll have to play around with it and see what works.

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on May 11, 2012 at 10:57 am

    Sweet dough cycle because of the eggs is what I understood. I never use this cuz I dont use eggs (allergy) and I have a gluten free cycle. :-)

    [Reply]

  • Debby Burke

    posted on June 8, 2012 at 6:52 pm

    Hi, I was wondering about the xanthan gum in this recipe; I was using Bob’s Red Mill but it is sourced from wheat starch which can have gluten in it. Is there a xanthan gum that is gluten free? I am also allergic to corn.

    Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Debby Burke, The Bob’s Red Mill xanthan gum I use is labeled gluten-free. It has been tested and verified as such per the information on the front of the package.

    Here is a link to the page at Bob’s Red Mill:
    http://www.bobsredmill.com/xanthan-gum.html?&cat=

    [Reply]

  • starfish

    posted on July 17, 2012 at 4:32 pm

    Hi – I made a loaf of your bread. I followed the recipe exactly and made no substitutions. It looked great, rose nicely and did not collapse. When I sliced it after letting it cool, it was very dense and overall had an odd, unpleasant flavor.

    You should re-name your recipe, because everyone has a different view of what perfect is.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @starfish, I’m so sorry that your bread didn’t turn out well. Something clearly went wrong because this is a perfect loaf of gluten-free bread. It should have been light in the center, just like a loaf of wheat bread. Maybe you’ll try it again with better results. Gluten-free baking can be finicky and sometimes requires some practice.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kristie

    posted on August 14, 2012 at 11:11 am

    This post is strictly an FYI, not a complaint about the recipe.

    So, I THOUGHT I had Xanthum Gum on hand, but it turns out that I didn’t. So, I used Guar Gum. It wrecked my bread. I just wanted to let everyone know NOT to use Guar Gum instead of Xanthum Gum. It will make your bread “gush” all over the sides while rising and cooking and then will collapse in the middle. I will try this recipe again with Xanthum Gum when I get ahold of some at the grocery store. It is possible that I somehow wrecked this in some other way, but I don’t think so. I think the Guar Gum is the likely culprit.

    [Reply]

    Beth Baker Reply:

    @Kristie, Thank you so much for this info!!! I had asked about guar gum on this post long ago but no one came up with an answer. I am very allergic to xantham gum and wondered if guar gum would substitute. Many, many thanks!!

    [Reply]

  • Jeremi

    posted on September 25, 2012 at 4:38 pm

    For 3 months, I have to eliminate many ingredients…including sugar, gluten, and yeast. Is there any kind of bread that I make without these three ingredients??

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeremi, You can make a quick bread without yeast. But I don’t know how to make a regular loaf of bread without yeast.

    [Reply]

  • Alicia M.

    posted on October 12, 2012 at 12:00 am

    Hi! Your bread looks soooo good! I hope I can make it! I don’t have a stand mixer though :( Any way I can make it successfully without this??? Please let me know! Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Alicia M., I’ve never tried it without a stand mixer but if you try a hand mixer please let me know the results.

    [Reply]

  • Judy

    posted on October 13, 2012 at 2:48 pm

    I made this bread today, I was a little worried never made bread with these flours. It was amazing and so easy to make loved the crusty top and I couldn’t taste the bean flour at all. This is a winner!! Thank you so much for sharing.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Judy, I am so glad you like it. No, the bean flavor isn’t prominent at all. How did you let the bread rise?

    [Reply]

  • Katherine

    posted on October 24, 2012 at 4:56 pm

    Hi Amy, I am new to bread baking but need to make THIS bread. :) I don’t have a stand mixer yet. What should I use?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Katherine, You can try a hand mixer – what kind do you have?

    [Reply]

  • lymielou.blogspot.com

    posted on October 27, 2012 at 9:46 pm

    Oh my goodness!! This bread.. is INCREDIBLE!!!! My husband, who is a huge lover of white bread, ate some and did a double take. YAY! I am thrilled. Thank you!!!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @lymielou.blogspot.com, Thanks for letting me know!

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on October 29, 2012 at 2:35 pm

    NOW that I have added eggs back in my diet, I would like to know if there are any other flours I could sub for the bean flour. Quinoa was tried and suggested but to me, it has a very strong taste. Has anyone else tried using some other type of flour with success? Maybe oat flour?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Farzana, You can try out flour but I am not sure if it will work. Let me know what you do!

    BTW – this bread doesn’t taste beany. It doesn’t taste like wheat bread either. :) It’s not wheat.

    [Reply]

  • Harriet

    posted on November 1, 2012 at 5:23 pm

    Hi Amy
    The bread looks great. I understand this is your flour blend, but I don’t like the taste of bean flours and can’t have xanthan. Do you have any suggestions for substitutions?
    Where do you get a proofing box and what is it’s job?
    Thanks

    Harriet

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Harriet, I am not sure about what you’d sub for the bean flours. They work really well. Instead of xanthan you can try 1 tablespoon of ground chia seeds but it won’t work as well. A proofing box is just a plastic box that is big enough to create a warm environment for your bread to rise.

    [Reply]

  • Melissa Heiselt

    posted on November 20, 2012 at 1:53 pm

    Just made a double batch using garbanzo bean flour instead of garfava, and it was PERFECT!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Melissa Heiselt, Thanks for letting me know, Melissa! I am so glad. How was the flavor? Was it beany at all? Sometimes people report that the pure garbanzo flour has a stronger taste.

    [Reply]

    Melissa Heiselt Reply:

    @Amy, I should clarify: I used your basic flour blend, subbing the garfava with garbanzo (We have a fava bean allergy. Weird, I know!) not straight garbanzo flour. It was a little beany, but not that noticeable the day it was made. I did find it was a stronger bean flavor the following day. The success of having ACTUAL bread-like consistency for our BREAD… more than made up for it, imho!

    [Reply]

  • Cheryl

    posted on November 25, 2012 at 3:31 am

    This is AMAZING bread! Threw caution to the wind and put it in the bread machine. Whisked liquids first, spooned blended dry on top, gluten free setting, 2 pound loaf, med crust, HEAVEN. I didn’t change a thing, and I wouldn’t! Thank you for a fabulous recipe!

    [Reply]

  • lauren

    posted on November 28, 2012 at 1:22 pm

    I’ve been experimenting with gluten free bread baking, but I’m finding that the breads all seem a little “eggy” to my husband and I. Do you have any recommendations? I tend to use ground flax as a substitute when I make pizza dough. I’m wondering if it is something I’m doing wrong, or are homemade gluten free breads “eggy” in general? Thanks in advance!

    [Reply]

  • Lauren

    posted on November 30, 2012 at 11:18 am

    This is NOT what people need. Plam Sugar is Sugar no matter what the source. And any fructose is bad..including Agave. Flour is flour whether with or without Gluten. It’s the wheat, corn, soybeans, nearly all fats (except coconut and olive oil) all of which are not good for you.

    If you can figure out how to make a bread without Soy, Eggs, Corn, Dairy, Gluten, Sugar etc…then great. Otherwise have a great baguette on a rare occasion and enjoy it since this bread will do the same damage to you internally and certainly tastes much better.

    [Reply]

  • Sandi in MN

    posted on December 4, 2012 at 11:06 am

    I made this yesterday and it’s really good. I got a good rise out of it, used my microwave for a proofing box, it did take longer than an hour but it’s cold here, so that may be why. I let it cool on it’s side like you suggested so it didn’t fall. I did substitute Quinoa flour in for the garfava since I didn’t have it and I used coconut crystals for the sugar. I’m not sure I love the quinoa flour flavor(will have to order some of the garfava for future use) but when I toasted a piece this morning it was fine. I love quinoa as a food but not sure of it for flour? I’ll keep experimenting! Thanks for a great recipe. I’m new to all the gluten-free stuff so it’s really helpful to have your blog!

    [Reply]

  • Claire

    posted on January 5, 2013 at 5:54 pm

    Hi Amy – Happy new year! Thanks for sharing your great recipe. I just made this bread following your recipe exactly except for the flour mix; instead of using garfava flour I used garbanzo flour as that is what I have on hand. Thanks for adding the grams in the recipe as it is very helpful. My bread turned out perfect! It rose very well; about twice and the texture and flavor was perfect. It does not have the bean-y taste at all. I took photos and it looks just like your photo above. I will definitely use this recipe again!!

    [Reply]

  • andrea

    posted on January 23, 2013 at 7:53 pm

    Hi Amy – I made this bread the other day and my husband loved it! He said it was better than any of the wheat breads I had ever made! I just had a small problem with it rising. It didn’t seem to rise very much. I also proofed the yeast first. The mixture was quite thick and I’m wondering if I should’ve added some more water? I used 2 cups sougham flour and 1 cup tapioca flour.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @andrea, The bread dough is thick, so that’s not the issue. I don’t proof the yeast first – I use instant yeast that doesn’t require proofing. Your flour blend is probably the issue. Try it again with the blend I use and see what happens. There is a link to my blend in the recipe.

    [Reply]

  • Sheryl

    posted on January 31, 2013 at 3:20 pm

    This is truly perfect! Made it today and I’m so thrilled. I won’t be spending $6-7 a loaf anymore! Perfect for sandwiches (school lunches-yay!) Thanks for another great recipe Amy!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sheryl, Yea!! Another success!! I’m so glad you enjoy this loaf, Sheryl!

    [Reply]

  • Kimberly

    posted on February 17, 2013 at 7:36 pm

    Hi Amy! This may be a silly question…I’m not that familiar with baking. Is active dry yeast the same thing as instant yeast. I can’t seem to find yeast at my store that says instant. What brand yeast do you use?

    [Reply]

    Kimberly Reply:

    Hmmmmm….I didn’t have any rise. Must have been my yeast. (Or maybe how I mixed it? I don’t have a stationary blender.) Looking forward to hear what brand yeast you use for my next try. :) Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Kimberly Reply:

    @Kimberly,

    I’m back. :) I found a packet of yeast that said instant, tried another time and still didn’t get the rise that you get. hmmmmmm Only thing I think I’m doing different is I don’t have a stationary blender. Could that be it? Thanks in advance for your help!

    [Reply]

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  • Brittany

    posted on April 7, 2013 at 3:26 pm

    I just made your bread for the first time and it is AMAZING! I will never ever buy frozen bread again. It really couldn’t be more perfect, even my gluten loving family said it tasted like regular bread which is the biggest compliment from them. Thank you so much for an easy to follow bread recipe.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Brittany, Yea! I’m so happy to hear it, Brittany!!

    [Reply]

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  • Jocelynne

    posted on May 27, 2013 at 9:49 am

    This recipe sounds great. However, I am trying to stay clear of vegetable oils. Is there a substitute you suggest I use instead of Canola oil?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jocelynne, Any neutral flavored oil would work: I haven’t tried coconut oil.

    [Reply]

  • Sarah

    posted on June 29, 2013 at 9:40 pm

    Sooo… I think I love you! This bread is so good. My hubs and I both have newly assessed gluten intolerance, as well as a four-year-old with suspected allergies as well. I was not going to pay five bucks or more for sandwich bread and I tried this recipe first. I LOVE IT! I used your “high protein” flour mix and it tastes better than our standard store bought wheat bread- heck, better than good ‘ol white bread too! I couldn’t even wait for it to cool! It slices perfect, has a great “bounce”, wonderful airy texture and a slightly crunchy crust. I can’t wait for my son to try it! Oh, and it was easy! SOOO EASY! For all of those out there who think that gluten-free is bland or you will miss your favorite breads- try this bread! Also, another huge up-side to gluten-free baking- NO kneading! Thank you for this amazing recipe and I cannot wait to try more!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sarah, Thanks, Sarah!! So glad you like the bread. I love to bake bread….it’s so grounding.

    [Reply]

  • Jacinthe

    posted on July 2, 2013 at 10:49 am

    Do you have a recipe that could be used for hamburger buns. The store bough ones are way to dry and crumbly.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jacinthe, I have scooped this recipe into english muffin rings and baked burger buns. It works great!

    [Reply]

  • Cheryl

    posted on July 18, 2013 at 8:54 pm

    Is there a way to use flax meal instead of eggs – allergic to gluten, eggs, dairy : (
    Been looking everywhere for a recipe for decent bread and have seen where you can use flax meal in place of eggs?? Thank you!!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cheryl, Yes, you can use a flax egg but you won’t get the same result. It will be a little flatter.

    [Reply]

  • Alice

    posted on August 14, 2013 at 9:34 am

    Hi Amy,

    I have just found this recepie and your website which look great! One question, is there an alternative to palm sugar you could suggest please? I’m avoiding all sugar except a small amount of Manuka honey (as per the Clean and Lean way to eat). I would love to still be able to have bread though. There is loads of GF available here but all contains sugar! :-( Thanks

    [Reply]

    Sarah Reply:

    @Alice, Amy- I don’t cook with sugar either, and nor did I have instant yeast- so I proofed my yeast in honey and the recipe amount of water instead and it turned out great. If you wisk the honey into the water if using instant yeast then that should work too. I have made the bread about 6-7 times and used honey on all accounts and never had a problem.

    [Reply]

    AmyK Reply:

    Alice, or Amy, How much honey do you use to replace the sugar? My daugher is allergic to sugar so I was hoping to use honey as well, but I’m new to this…

    [Reply]

  • Patricia Ann

    posted on August 19, 2013 at 8:33 am

    Hi Amy,
    Just found your great site and this bread when looking for GF baguettes.
    Is this recipe in your book?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Patricia Ann, My baguette recipe is under breads on my recipe page:

    http://simplysugarandglutenfree.com/recipes/

    Enjoy!

    [Reply]

  • Sugar free

    posted on September 9, 2013 at 9:47 pm

    Hi
    I’m very keen to find a sugar free bread recipe. Yours however has palm sugar in it, which is so bad…. Not sure why you’re calling it sugar free???

    [Reply]

  • demi

    posted on October 24, 2013 at 10:28 am

    hi,was wondering in basic flour mix..can i use brown rice flour with millet or amaranth or sth else because i cant have sorghum and we dont like the bean flavor alot…?i have brown rice flour,quinoa,millet,amaranth,teff,corn,oat.

    [Reply]

  • BrendaK

    posted on February 10, 2014 at 8:36 pm

    Please excuse my ignorance, but can you provide a pic or a description of a ‘mixer paddle’ — because google images provides mixed results and Amazon doesn’t have anything with that name for stand mixers, and I really don’t know where else to look.

    Thanks so much!

    [Reply]

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