• Heather @CeliacFamily

    posted on September 19, 2010 at 10:33 pm

    I love reading successful stories like this. I understand that it isn’t always easy for the medical profession to figure out what is going on with young patients. But I do wish more of them would listen to the parents, who are closer to the situation, and consider other options that may not be on their checklist of treatments. I hope that the family continues to have good results with their new diet. Amy, thanks to you and the family for sharing their story.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Heather @CeliacFamily, I thought of you when I read this story – actually I recently referred a reader your way. She was looking for healthier, kid-friendly recipes and you do such a great job in that arena. Hugs!

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  • Ari

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 4:29 am

    Amy, I just want to say that your writing (not just the recipes, but your charming stories and constant support) really provides an invaluable service for many of us. That you throw all of that into cyberspace, including your own struggles, and don’t expect anything in return is incredible. This is my favourite blog and every time I visit and see your beautiful photo, I can’t help but smile – your words always make my day, even when I’ve spent it completely down, depressed, angry, or tired. That you are willing to not only post photos you don’t feel comfortable sharing, but also can honestly admit to feeling ashamed by them, just shows how lovely a person you are, regardless of your weight.
    Thank you so much!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ari, Thanks so much…I’m so grateful that you find my blog helpful. I’ve found that the saying, “You always get more than you give” truly applies to blogging because your comment just filled up my heart. Sending hugs, Ari.

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  • cdecocina

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 6:39 am

    I find that experience really interesting, as it sounds that many people have food intollerances without noticing. Going gluten and sometimes dairy free seems the solution to many people. It´s a pity that “official” medicine hasn´t heard about that…

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    Amy Reply:

    @cdecocina, I think that many doctors are starting to see how much food can affect patients. The more we share in a positive light, the better chance we have of impacting their views. It’s all about education…and that takes time. Heck, it took me a long time to get a grip on gluten-free eating and I’m still learning more every day.

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  • Miz Helen

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 7:22 am

    What we put on our table for our family matters. It can make all the difference in family life. I live with serious food allergies as do some of my children. God Bless you for sharing your life experience to help others.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Miz Helen, I couldn’t agree more…it’s the thoughtful composition of healthier meals that nourish our families’ bodies that really makes a difference. It starts at home…thank goodness that homemaking is finally popular again. Gotta’ love what Martha Stewart has done for women, huh? :)

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  • carrie @ gingerlemongirl.com

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 9:50 am

    What a beautiful life changing story Amy! I’m so glad you were able to help this family and their son! Thank you for sharing!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @carrie @ gingerlemongirl.com, I think it’s the combined, daily effort of all bloggers that helps bring awareness. When we work together, we can make big changes.

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  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 9:55 am

    Crying here. Tears of joy. So many children and adults are suffering so many symptoms and illnesses related to gluten. To hear this success story totally makes my day and I’m going to share it with as many as possible. I recently read that anti-cholesterol meds were approved for children and that broke my heart. I wonder how many of those children with high cholesterol have much more going on. When we’re eating the wrong things, our body has run amok and can’t be righted by simply taking meds or wanting to do the right thing (the cravings, insulin resistance, etc. just keep going). The offending ingredients have to be removed completely. I sooo love reading this Amy. I truly believe miracles like this one can happen every day if we spread the word. Thanks so much for sharing it and please know Amy that by writing this blog and sharing your story you’re like a support group leader to so very many!

    xo,
    Shirley

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @gfe–gluten free easily, I’m sure you hear stories like this so often as your support group leader, Shirley. That’s a role that takes a big heart…you’re perfect for it. As a former elementary school teacher, I was completely touched by this mom’s determination to help her child no matter what. So often the fear of ‘what other people will think’ takes over but not this mom! She’s a role model and a great example of how to truly care for our children.

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  • Kim @ Cook It Allergy Free

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 11:19 am

    Oh, Amy! The emails like this are the very reason we do this, isn’t it? You should feel so wonderful that you were part of this story.
    I think you are living in your “Zone of Genius” for sure (realizing that must sound weird to anyone who has not read the book).

    Thank you so much for sharing the journey of this family!
    xo
    Kim

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kim @ Cook It Allergy Free, You’re sweet to point that out and give me a push in the right direction…I sometimes forget. I love that book!!

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  • Sarah vanWoerden

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 12:13 pm

    Beautiful story. Thank you for sharing it with us. Inspiring. Makes me appreciate the little things we do for each other all the time.

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  • Alta

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 12:21 pm

    Amy, this story has touched my heart. We were talking the other day about how sometimes, when we’re blogging, we don’t always know how we’re perceived by others and what they get from it. And you mentioned the other day how you couldn’t believe how many people volunteered to test recipes in your book. THIS is why. You are so genuine in your posts, so real, so honest, that people like “Jane” (and all of the other readers) connect with you and your writing – really connect. Perhaps the greatest reward of all is when something like this happens – that your words have helped to change the lives of a family. Congrats, Amy, on all of your hard work, and thank you for sharing this.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Alta, You’re so sweet…I’m teary. I know…as a blogger it’s often so strange because it’s hard to tell if anyone will miss the post you have to stay up super late to write or the recipe that you’ve made twice now and, gosh, it’s close but not good enough to publish. Sometimes it feels like it would be easier to just skip a day or take some time off but then something like this happens and I’m reminded that this blog isn’t about me and what I want, it’s about helping others.

    And, the real gift is having friends like you that I can e-mail anytime for help, have dinner with, and just talk about normal life stuff. Sending hugs…and looking forward to dinner!!

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  • Alisa

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 1:23 pm

    Wow, that must feel amazing! Nothing keeps you blogging more than hearing success stories like this. We are convinced that gluten is a huge problem for my brother-in-law (he has big weight issues and an obvious dependency on breads), but they don’t even consider diet as being related to all of their health issues.

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  • KatieC

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 3:15 pm

    I found you because of Katie’s site, so I’m sure glad you went ahead with your post over there! :)

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  • Laura Russell

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 5:08 pm

    I am a Registered Dietitian and stories like this give me chills because I see so many kids with problems exactly like this!!! I am well versed in Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance and this may have to be something I will suggest for some of the kidos I see. Thanks! I am going to share this with our local gluten-free support group.

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  • Suzanne Collier

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 5:09 pm

    Wow, what a great testament to what we can do when we help ourselves and we end up inspiring and helping so many others! How rewarding!

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  • Maggie

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 7:20 pm

    Oh Amy this is a wonderful post. Thank you so much for sharing, I am so glad you did. We saw such a dramatic change in Callum once gluten was removed from his diet. The spectrum of reactions/symptoms astonishes me. This post will definitely help at least one more person on their journey to health and happiness. What an effect you’re having! xo

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  • Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship

    posted on September 20, 2010 at 7:41 pm

    Amy and “Jane,”
    I am all to honored to have played a role in this beautiful and life-changing story. As we embark on a grain-free gut-healing attempt for my husband, it’s really encouraging to hear success stories like this! What an honor to have hosted Amy’s amazing story, one of my favorites from the Spring Cleaning Carnival to be sure.

    :) Katie

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  • Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen

    posted on September 21, 2010 at 1:06 pm

    Amy, I echo what a lot of people here have already said. You are an amazing person – so caring and giving, so in a way it doesn’t surprise me that your post had such an impact on someone. You are truly courageous!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen, Thanks, Jen. You’re a little too kind but I so appreciate you and your friendship. You’ve been so helpful and supportive not only to me but so many others. Hugs, Jenn.

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  • Roz

    posted on September 21, 2010 at 2:25 pm

    Hello Amy, this is my first visit here, so I am now following, I also linked up my beet salad recipe and posted your link on my blog post…if I did anything wrong please help me correct it so that you won’t delete me. I hope that you stop by, follow back and link up to my Fresh Clean and Pure Fridays over on my blog too. Bye for now and keep up the great inspiration! Roz

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Roz, I just visited your beautiful blog. Thanks so much for linking up to SIT and thanks for the invite to your party on Friday.

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  • Debi

    posted on September 22, 2010 at 7:28 am

    Amy, I know how difficult it is to share the bad along with the good. We like sharing the good, but without those moments of struggling, we wouldn’t have them. Your Kitchen Stewardship article is actually how I found you and your blog. Your struggles are what made me connect and realize there are other people out there like me. Thank you for wearing your heart on your sleeve and showing us the side of you that you were hesitant to share.

    ~Debi

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Debi, Wow….I didn’t even realize that. Thank you for letting me know. It’s quite humbling to hear that my story has helped others. Sending hugs.

    [Reply]

    Debi Reply:

    @Amy, You’re welcome! I think this is the best thing about the blogosphere community. As bloggers, we get to share our experience with the hope that it will touch someone. As readers, we connect with the bloggers who have been through what we are going through and give us that hope to keep at it. I’m thankful for you and the other bloggers that I’ve followed these last few months. Hugs in return.

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  • Tracee

    posted on September 23, 2010 at 8:33 am

    I’m glad you posted this. So many people like us have watched miracles happen before our eyes just from changing our diets. More stories like this need to be told so more people can find out if dietary changes can help them. We have our son back and my health thanks to running across stories like this (but for autism). Ever since, this has been a passion for me. What’s so great about your work is that it solves the problem of “What in the world do I eat?????”. It’s so hard to get used to a new diet, you site is so valuable!

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  • Pat

    posted on September 24, 2010 at 1:42 pm

    Wow!

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  • Jameson Hatfield

    posted on October 30, 2011 at 9:54 pm

    Isn’t it interesting that you and I, though not doctors, need to be the ones who convince the doctors to start “seeing” that diet really matters? Astonishing! The Doctors should be the ones leading out! Use you doctors, but use them as a resource, not your primary source. They are not “all-knowing,” any more than you or I are in our professions. We all make mistakes. Your typical MD does little to no research, so if it’s not 100 out of 100 times that i know more than my doctor, then I’d be surprised. (Did you know that when you are waiting in the “waiting room,” often they are searching the Internet for your complaint so they can be briefed on it when they come face to face with you?)

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  • Charmaine

    posted on November 4, 2011 at 2:12 pm

    Hello Amy,

    I’ve been reading your blog and trying many of your terrific recipes for the past three months. That was when I moved across the country and, temporarily, moved in with my daughter and her husband. Over the past year they have been on their own ‘food journey’: she because she was trying to get pregnant, and wanted to ensure that she was as healthy as possible (she had her thyroid and parathyroid removed a couple of years ago and since then has had to closely manage and monitor her calcium and other mineral levels), and he because of a number of strange symptoms, which traditional medicine had not been able help with.

    Their success, after undergoing testing for allergies and intolerances, was very apparent, and got me questioning the possibility that I might also be gluten intolerant. That “insatiable food craving” that you described so well is what I felt constantly. Now, after three months gluten and simple sugar free, I can honestly say that there are times when I now have to remind myself to eat, because I don’t have those cravings anymore. I am continuing to lose weight, at about a pound per week, and am feeling amazing! In the beginning I didn’t know how I would endure not being able to make and eat all my old favourites. But websites like yours showed me the way to continue enjoying food – food that wouldn’t make me sick.

    Here, in eastern Canada, there is a growing understanding of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, but there is still such a long way to go. I am trying to do my part, by having those tough conversations with friends and family, and am setting up my own blog.

    You’ve been a great inspiration through all this. Many thanks.

    Charmaine

    [Reply]

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