• Denise

    posted on September 9, 2009 at 9:48 am

    So excited to see your gluten free flour mix. Though I don’t have issues with gluten, I very rarely eat sugar or white flour. I find I feel better, have less cravings & more energy when I eat this way. And it also helps me to get and keep weight off.

    We do grind our own wheat as it is healthier…which has led to my experimenting with different grains. Like half the flour I use in my pancakes is oat flour (grinding my oats in the coffee grinder). I subscribed to your blog for this reason.

    For sweeteners I mainly use pure maple syrup, honey granules and honey depending on what I am making.

    I see a lot of recipes I can’t wait to try!

    [Reply]

  • Sandy Gillett

    posted on October 16, 2009 at 11:47 am

    Thank you Amy. You should see all the jars of different GF flours in my cupboard that I bought before I found your website. I was trying to figure this out for myself. Oh My Goodness! Thank you!

    [Reply]

  • Allyson

    posted on February 6, 2010 at 10:05 pm

    Hi. I am definitely on the new side of GF and sugar free living!! and have been trying to experiment with recipes…without much results worth talking about. I love this website already! One question i have is regarding the xanthan gum- i have seen several different brands, do you recommend a certain brand, does it matter?
    Thanks again for a really helpful website!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Allyson, I have been buying Bob’s Red Mill. Make sure to store it in an airtight container – I use a pint mason jar. Keep it in a cool, dry place. It can go rancid.

    It’s expensive for such a small amount but it lasts for a long, long time.

    [Reply]

  • kelly

    posted on March 8, 2010 at 10:26 am

    I am not a fan of any type of bean flours. I know they are a good source of protein for a flour blend, I just can’t stand the smell or the taste. Do you have any suggestions for a bean flour substitute? Thanks, Kelly

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @kelly, Try sorghum or brown rice flour – they’re both pretty neutral. I buy Arrowhead Mills brown rice flour and then put it in a clean coffee grinder to make it a finer texture. You can buy superfine brown rice flour but it’s more expensive, $10 – 12 a bag. Millet it lighter and relatively neutral, too, but I’d mix it with other flours.

    If you like grain assertive flour try quinoa.

    [Reply]

  • kellyc

    posted on March 8, 2010 at 1:29 pm

    I really like all the ones you mentioned. I get my vitamix (woohoo!) with the grain attachment this week so that is opening up a whole new window of opportunity for grains, etc. Thanks, Kelly

    [Reply]

  • Samantha

    posted on April 15, 2010 at 4:08 pm

    Hi Amy,

    A friend sent me a recipe link for your Carrot Cake Bites and I have been exploring your site when i came across your flour blend recipe I was wondering what I could use to replace the cornstarch in the recipe as I have a corn intolerance. Thanks Samantha

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Samantha, You can try any starch-based product – use all tapioca starch or try potato starch. Arrowroot would also be a good substitute. I often use arrowroot and there is no noticeable difference.

    [Reply]

    Kellie Reply:

    I am new to this website. My daughter was diagnosed with celiac last week and I am working on changing everything out in my pantry and have just started researching. Is arrowroot a flour?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kellie, Hi Kellie,

    Wow, you have a lot going on. It’s great that your daughter got diagnosed so young. It will help avoid all the health problems that someone with Celiac can develop when it goes undiagnosed too long.

    Arrowroot is technically a starch but it is used as a flour. You’ll see it labeled as Arrowroot Starch/Flour.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    Christine Reply:

    @Amy, If I can’t eat corn or potato can I use tapioca to replace them?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christine, You can but realize that the outcome will be slightly different. Potato starch thickens differently and is a little more dense than tapioca starch.

  • Cheryl Padilla

    posted on May 2, 2010 at 3:17 pm

    I love the information about the gluten, and just a couple of weeks ago have also been following information from the eating for your blood type. Some of the ingredients or flours are not according to blood type, such as soy and tapioca. Also, would like to know what WILL help he breads rise with the alternate flours, as I have found the non-gluten flours tend to be really dense. I am also having a extremely hard time finding xanthan gum in the stores here. Besides online am I possibly looking in the wrong aisle?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cheryl Padilla, The bread problem might be the recipe you’re using. Where did you get the recipes from? I use normal bread yeast and it works well. Xanthan gum – I can only find it at the specialty stores like Whole Foods. You might have to order it from Amazon.com. I use Bob’s Red Mill and though it seems expensive it lasts forever. 8 months to a year, and I do a lot of baking.

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    I found xanthan gum at Walmart and Publix in the baking isle.

    [Reply]

    Samantha Reply:

    @Cheryl Padilla, Hi Cheryl you may be able to find it in the organic section of your local grocery store, thats where I have found mine.

    [Reply]

  • Kolleen Adams

    posted on May 3, 2010 at 9:31 pm

    My husband and I have been South Beach Dieting and want to continue on a low/non sugar and gluten free diet after we lose weight.

    He has amazing willpower but I have a horrible sweet tooth.

    I am so glad I found your website, especially your flour mixes!

    [Reply]

  • Cindy Drozda

    posted on June 11, 2010 at 2:47 pm

    Amy, Congratulations on winning the blogger contest! Just goes to show the power of Community! When we stick together and support each other, we all win!

    Thank you for your always so thoughtful and inspiring recipes and posts. Like this one. The subject of flours and mixes is a complicated one.

    I realize, on reading what you say, that it’s also a very personal one. I gotta admit, I do like the rich strong flavors of whole grains and bean flour. I object to using “starch” of any kind, and just willfully substitute other grains. The results always please me! I’m not after an imitation of the glutenoid world, I’m creating healthy tasty food. It’s fun and creative in a way that I never thought cooking could be.

    Following someone else’s flour mix recipe is a great way to have success at first. Just like with any creative endeavor, as time goes on we develop our own style.

    Thank you, all of you, for sharing your experiences.

    Cindy

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cindy Drozda, I’m like you – I can’t get enough of the rich beany and grain flours. The starch was at first an easy way to have success and the I got away from it. For now, I take the middle road. A little isn’t a bad thing because it does improve the overall quality of the baked goods.

    I used to bake just for me – but the longer I blog the more I find myself baking for my readers. I want to give them recipes that they can serve with confidence and pride. I’ve found that the average person doesn’t share my love of assertive grain and bean flours, so again I practice moderation.

    I took some peanut butter cupcakes to a meeting the other day and everyone was giving me a thumbs up as they were passed around the table. They were gluten-free and used a sugar alternative – and everyone there hadn’t had gluten-free, sugar-free food before. It was neat to know that they loved my food. :)

    Would love to see some of your recipes – they sound right up my alley. Hugs.

    [Reply]

  • sunny

    posted on July 29, 2010 at 9:31 am

    What can I substitute for potato starch? I eat no wheat, corn, soy, potato, tomato, gluten, refined sugar or salt (himalayan salt is ok)or gmo products
    Thanks,
    Sunny

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @sunny, I don’t know for sure – maybe sweet rice flour? It’s hard to tell without trying it. I know that there is non-gmo cornstarch which might have a similar effect.

    [Reply]

  • Meredith

    posted on July 30, 2010 at 10:08 pm

    I noticed that you said that you don’t use your all-purpose mix (the last one) as much anymore (you crossed that line out)…which do you use instead? Several of your recipes list all-purpose flour blend as an ingredient but it just links to this page so it is hard to know which blend you are referring to and I want to get the same results in my baking you are! Thanks for this site, I am new to GF and this will truly help.

    [Reply]

  • lillie

    posted on October 28, 2010 at 3:11 pm

    Do you use your Sorghum-Garfava Blend four any recipe that calls for white flour?

    Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @lillie, Yes, I sure do. :) Have fun cooking, Lillie!

    [Reply]

  • Kristen

    posted on December 8, 2010 at 11:26 am

    Hi Amy!

    I made your high-protein flour blend when I made graham crackers for the cheesecake recipe (YUM BTW) and now I have quite a bit left–can you suggest some more recipes that use this flour blend? I’d hate to let it go to waste :(

    Thanks!

    Kristen

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kristen, It works in lots of recipes here…you can pretty much sub it in anything. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • V

    posted on December 20, 2010 at 1:29 pm

    Um… any suggestions for potato starch or potato flour? I don’t personally have anything against them… just can’t eat them. :(

    Would casava/tapioca flour work?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @V, I’m sure it would work – the recipes might be a little different. I haven’t tried it with 100% tapioca starch but I can’t see why it wouldn’t. Another option is arrowroot – some of my recipe testers used all arrowroot with good results. :)

    Hugs!!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • V

    posted on December 20, 2010 at 1:30 pm

    Sorry, should have mentioned that corn starch won’t work either… no corn. :(

    [Reply]

  • V

    posted on December 20, 2010 at 7:05 pm

    Oh, Arrow Root! I forgot about Arrowroot!
    That stuff is awesome as a thickener, esp. when kudzu is too strong.

    I even think I have some! Sweet!

    [Reply]

  • Andrea

    posted on December 28, 2010 at 4:42 pm

    Amy, I just want you to know that I love your Basic Flour Blend – with sorghum and garfava. You definitely have a winner as I find that it works in a one to one substitution in all the recipes I have tried – just like you said! When I first started baking gluten free I struggled to find a flour blend that worked, but I need to look no further! I also love that it adds protein to my baked goods.
    Thanks for making gluten free baking so much easier!

    [Reply]

  • Emily

    posted on February 5, 2011 at 4:22 am

    Hi I was looking at your recipe for Gluten free bread which bought me to this page to look at your flour mix. It looks good but I’m in relatively remote area in Australia and I can’t buy garfava flour. I was wondering if I could replace the garfava flour with garbanzo flour? Thanks :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Emily, Yes…it should work perfectly. Someone else left a comment and said that they made that substitution and it turned out well. (I haven’t tried it so I’m just sharing what worked for them.)

    Hugs!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • stacey

    posted on February 7, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    Hi I have recently had to cut out sugar, dairy, gluten, and caffeine and love your website. It is very useful and it makes this experience less overwhelming. I was wondering how long the flour blends can be kept pre-mixed in an air tight container in the fridge? I like having things on hand and just wondered how long they will actually last?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @stacey, I’ve never had any of my refrigerated flours go bad. You can also pop them in the freezer for longer term storage. :)

    [Reply]

  • Gretchen

    posted on February 8, 2011 at 11:31 am

    Hi Amy – I noticed in your ancient grains recipe that you call for 60 grams for each flour – for the sorghum you have 2 tsp and 1/2 cup for 60 grams yet for the amaranth you have 2 tbsp and 1/2 cup. Is this correct?

    Also, can I make your basic bread recipe in my zo bread maker?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Gretchen, Yes, the Ancient Grains is correct…each flour weighs a different amount. :) I don’t know about the zo bread maker – I don’t have one. Give it a whirl and let us know what happens.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • hippie4ever

    posted on February 10, 2011 at 1:37 am

    Hi Amy!

    Thank you for all the great recipes. If you can’t have potatoes, what would be a good substitute in the Basic flour blend?

    Thank You.

    [Reply]

  • hippie4ever

    posted on February 10, 2011 at 1:39 am

    AHHH I should have read all the comments first. Found my answer. Thanks:)

    [Reply]

  • Susan McLaughlin

    posted on February 15, 2011 at 8:21 pm

    I love your blog and I’m new to gluten free cooking. I came to it in an effort to eat low carb and lose the weight I can’t seem to shake otherwise. I don’t understand how these flours which are rather high carb are that beneficial. Why don’t you use almond or coconut, etc.? I’ve been trying them, but they don’t produce the type of baked goods one is used to. Can you give me any guidance? Thank you!

    [Reply]

  • Marjorie

    posted on March 4, 2011 at 8:26 am

    Hi Amy,
    Do all of you mixes work for the sour dough starter, or is there one that you like best?
    Hoping to get this started real soon.

    Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Marjorie Reply:

    @Marjorie,
    I went back and checked out what you had written about the sour dough recipe and saw that it said you Basic flour mix. I should have gone back and read that first.
    So I have my answer. :)

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on March 16, 2011 at 8:42 pm

    Amy, I new to you website, but have found it most interesting to stay with. I’m a 62 yr old women with a daughter who has special needs as well as gluten intolerance as well as my self. Which took the drs. 10 years to find out why my daughter was suffering all these years. Anyway I’m having to learn how to cook GF and was never one to love cooking, only to feed my family and intertainment at times which I don’t do any more. So it really been hard for me to get the hang of the GF cooking. I haven’t tried you bread yet but it looks great. I have a few questions that I hope you have help me with. My daughter really loves bread and I haven’t been able to find one that comes out right yet. Anyway I read inorder to go true gluten we’re to stay away from Wheat, Rye, barley, oats, corn & Rice in order to be true grain free. As for the Sorghum and Quinoa flour we are ask to stay away from because mostly because of cross contamination. So in you Sorghum-Garfava Blend, can I use ALL Garbanzo fava bean flour and will it work? Other wise the blend is perfect. Also you use palm sugar, I have some cane sugar what is your opinion on cane. And by some miracle do you have a equal amount of sugar to convert to agave and also a equal amount to agave for Stevia(which I don’t use at all) but notice that it’s in some of your recipes. Also I don’t hardly blog at all, but I feel that you might be able to help me, but most of the time I busy with my daughter. I’m just hopeing that I’ll be able to find you answer to me because I New at this blogging stuff, and not sure how to come back and see my answer. I guess I just come back to this page and hope that your answer is here. Your websight seems like you care very much not only in your cooking but for others as well. I’m so glad I came apone your websight. Can’t wait to get you book also.
    Thank you for taking the time to help others that need you.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, Hi Molly! So glad you found my blog.

    Bob’s Red Mill makes certified gluten-free quinoa and sorghum flour. If you go to my Resources Page you can find where I buy them on-line. And, if you order from iHerb.com you can get $5 off your first order with code SIR086. It’s one of the most frugal resources when you want to just buy a bag or two.

    I can’t eat cane sugar, which is why I use palm sugar – also known as ‘coconut palm sugar.’

    There isn’t a hard and fast rule for converting from white sugar to agave but generally you have to reduce the amount of liquid in the recipe by 1/4 – 1/3 because you’re adding liquid.

    When using stevia, the entire recipe as a whole has to be reworked because it doesn’t have any of the same baking properties that cane sugar does.

    Wishing you all the best on your new journey!

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Molly Reply:

    @Amy, Amy, thanks for the reply your soooooo helpful. When I indicated if I could use All Garbarzo fava bean flour and if so how would it change it or would it come out at all? As for the cane sugar what is the difference and is any better than regular sugar? I just happen so have some on hand but haven’t used it yet, normaly I use regular sugar and agave. Thanks again for taking the time to reply.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, I don’t think the recipe would change much at all with all garbanzo bean flour but it’s just a guess. You’d have to try it. Cane sugar is the same as regular white sugar. Maybe you’re talking about coconut palm sugar? In that case it is better for you – it’s unrefined, lower glycemic, and contains nutrients.

    Read this:

    http://www.thespunkycoconut.com/2010/04/lets-talk-about-coconut-sap-sugar.html

    Lisa Imerman Reply:

    @Molly,

    As Amy said, you could substitute all bean flour but it will probably make the product a lot more dense and also I find bean flour has a very distinctive taste (some like it, some don’t) so if you like it, than it should not be an issue. Also, I find my son is very sensitive to gluten but we buy certified Gluten Free sorghum and other flours or grains( and grind them in my Blendtec blender to make flour). You may find you can tolerate other grains as long as they are certified Gluten Free. It is mostly trial and error in that regard on whether you can tolerate them. My son cannot have oats unless they are Certified Gluten Free, he reacted horribly to regular oats. I haven’t had a problem with rice. I have 2 sons and myself who are Gluten Intolerant. I personally don’t use bean flours as I don’t like the taste and my nephew cannot have legumes, so I mostly avoid them in my baking. I would highly suggest you do a bit of research on Agave Nectar as from my studies it is similar to High Fructose Corn Syrup in the way it is processed and how your body handles it, not really very healthy from what I have found. Good luck.

  • Julie

    posted on March 17, 2011 at 10:50 am

    Hi Amy,

    My daughter cannot have gluten, sugar OR potato starch.

    If I want to modify your flour blend recipes and substitute something else for the potato starch, what would you recommend?

    This website is a Godsend! I’m so excited to find someone who is both gluten-free AND sugar-free!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Julie, Try tapioca starch or arrowroot in place of the potato starch. I would try arrowroot first, but it’s more expensive. Tapioca starch should also do the trick. I’d make a small batch and try it…and please let me know how it works. I wish I had the time to test every possible combination but I just don’t.

    Glad you found me, too. Hugs to you, Julie.
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Nana Rogers

    posted on March 23, 2011 at 3:55 pm

    Amy,
    What if I mixed your Ancient Grains with your GF all purpose mix?
    I’m not crazy about the Fava bean flours. And trying to cut down on some of the starches. I haven’t tried the garbanzo bean flour, but would love your input on it.

    Thanks bunches.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Nana Rogers, I am not crazy about the starch either which is why it is less than 1/3 of the mix. I have found that a little starch makes a better, lighter product. This is the same thing they do when making whole wheat bread – if it was only used by itself it would produce a dense loaf. But with some all-purpose or bread flour it can make a light loaf.

    I like garbanzo bean flour but I like garbanzo-fava better because the bean flavor disappears when baked.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on March 23, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    Amy, I’m sorry to keep asking the more questions but, I remember why we can’t use the sorghum flour, they say in comes from corn????
    But have you tried Potato flour with you bread mix and if so how did it come out. I’m one not to try thing on my own because we have to eat it regardless how it comes out. do you think I should go all garbanzo bean flour, I couldn’t fine the Fava bean flour and I don’t buy on the internet yet, I guess I’m too old to start and just afraid. Anyway should I go All garbanzo bean or bean and potato, quinoa or what about almond, which would be close to sorghum besides rice flour. This bread looks sooooo good that I can’t wait to try it also would coconut flour be too sweet??
    Hope you can help me.
    Thanks again, (millet & teff or out also)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, I have never used potato flour. I wish I could give you a perfect answer but the truth about gluten-free baking is that when making substitutions you have to try it out and see how it works. Almond flour and coconut flour would be too different in texture to produce the same result without drastically modifying the recipe.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kelly

    posted on March 29, 2011 at 10:06 am

    Amy,
    a friend of mine directed me to your site as I was recently diagnosed with celiac’s. I also try to keep the refined sugar low as I has gastric bypass and still “dump” at 3+ years out. I just wanted to let you know that I’m really excited to try your recipes, especially the breads. I’ll also be trying your flour blends in my quest to create a GF cake that I can enjoy at our wedding this fall.
    Thanks so much for sharing your recipes, tip & tricks. I have a feeling this will make my new journey a lot easier!
    -Kelly H

    [Reply]

  • Skye

    posted on April 23, 2011 at 1:33 pm

    Hi Amy,

    I’m cleaning out my pantry getting ready to go gluten free. Do you have a list of pantry staples available? So many of the items you use to cook I’ve never even heard of…but I’m sure my local Whole Foods Market will have most of them. However, it sure would help to have a basic supplies shopping list…any suggestions?

    Thank you so much – and you look fantastic. Can’t wait to look and feel fantastic too!

    Skye

    [Reply]

  • Teri

    posted on August 30, 2011 at 12:53 pm

    Hi Amy,

    I need to be GRAIN-free. So, that means no sorghum, rice, corn, etc. Any ideas for a flour mix for me?

    thank you,
    teri

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Teri, You could use all garfava instead of sorghum in the basic blend. Try subbing flours you can use for the ones you can’t – you’ll find a blend that works for you. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Shawna

    posted on September 9, 2011 at 10:06 am

    Hi,

    I need a corn free, gluten free all purpose flour that is easy. I would like to use the ancient blend but I am not sure what you mean by “My Ancient Grains flour blend is intended to replace a small part of your total flour.” I am cooking for picky 4,6,8 year olds. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Shawna, I haven’t used it all by itself for any recipes – instead I use it as 20% or so to increase the nutritional benefit. Does that help?

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • MaryLynn

    posted on September 15, 2011 at 11:45 pm

    A few months ago, my husband and I started eliminating overly processed foods. We’ve each lost around 25 pounds, but have more to go. After some health issues, we’ve decided we need to eliminate wheat as well. Your fabulous website has just become my go to online hangout for information and recipes. Thanks so much!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @MaryLynn, Congratulations, MaryLynn! What in inspiration!! I am thrilled for you. So many people want to make the change but few have the gumption to go ahead and do it.
    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on September 16, 2011 at 6:34 pm

    I love your website, I have learned sooooooo much. My Daughter and I are Gluten Introlence and We’re doing ok, but could be doing better. It’s hard getting everything organic and grass fed beef, free range chicken and staying off corn and rice. Were doing ok but the cost of beef and chicken and organic is hard to keep up with. I think we still have problem because I can’t alway afford the cost of beef, chicken & organic all the time. Anyway I really wanted to tell you I love this sight and have learned about other from you sight, also love how when someone comes up with a new question you put it on email, that great, so we can see what more we can learn. My main problem it trying to stay away from sugar in my coffee and tea, everything else I can cook without it but will use it if the recipe calls for it. At 62 it takes everything I’ve got to learn all this New cooking in the past 2 years, I was’nt one for being in the kitchen anyway only because I’ve had too. And now that I’m retired (and thankful that I’m alive and able to retire), but I’m having to learn a new way of eating and cooking for my special needs daughter.
    Thank You Amy for all the time and hard work you put into this websight.
    You make my life a little easier.
    God Bless
    and Blessings for the one to come.
    Molly

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, I understand…it’s a hard change to make. It will get easier over time. I buy organic when I can but sometimes it’s not possible. Instead of having the perfect diet, I strive for improvement over time. It seems to work for me.

    Thank you for your kind words. Sending big hugs!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Cathy DeVoe

    posted on September 24, 2011 at 1:41 am

    Hi Molly,
    Thank you for all your help. My issues are not only can I not eat gluten or sugar free but I am allergic to potatoes, corn, sorghum, soy, sugar, nuts, vanilla and garbanzo beans. What would be a good flour blend of Rice flours, tapioca, maybe coconut? to make muffins, pancakes or cookies? Any ideas for me. Thank you for your time!!!

    [Reply]

    sam Reply:

    @Cathy DeVoe,

    Hi Cathy I recently made chocolate chip cookies using only Coconut Flour and they were really good. Even my husband who hates coconut liked them. I didn’t use a recipe I just kept adding the flour until it looked like the right consistency. Also made pancakes out of almonds that I grounded in my blender. As for sugar have you tried using palm sugar aka coconut sugar? Hope I have helped!

    [Reply]

  • Layna Melchert

    posted on November 7, 2011 at 8:37 pm

    Hello Amy,

    What can I use in place of bean flour? I have a friend who is allergic to all legumes (beans, lentils, soy), and I would like to make one of your recipes for him and his wife, but I can’t if they contain beans. Any suggestions?

    Layna Melchert

    [Reply]

  • Martine

    posted on November 8, 2011 at 12:31 pm

    Hi Amy,

    With all my intolerance ( gluten, lactose, soy, bean, rice ) would it be possible
    to try your Amy’s Basic Flour Blend (Sorghum-Garfava Blend)and use the variation: using sorghum flour,2 cups instead of one cup, with the tapioca and potato starch?

    Martine Bertrand

    [Reply]

  • Nicki

    posted on November 9, 2011 at 9:06 pm

    This is such a great resource. I am really struggling in the baking department. I used Betty Hagmans sorghum/fava/corn/tapioca mix and I keep getting flat bread. I am a new blogger, and have been out of the baking loop for a while. What can I do to make my bread rise? It tastes great, it jist looks like a rock. Thank you!!!! Nicki

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Nicki, Here is a great bread recipe:
    http://simplysugarandglutenfree.com/perfect-bread/

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Sunny

    posted on November 23, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    I’m so excited to try your flour blend, but i don’t know where to get the sorghum flour, do you have a link where i could order it from???

    Thanks,
    Sunny

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sunny, Hi Sunny – Yes, iHerb.com is one of my favorites – great prices and service.

    http://www.iherb.com/Bob-s-Red-Mill-Sweet-White-Sorghum-Flour-Gluten-Free-22-oz-1-lb-6-oz-623-g/15698?at=0&rcode=SIR086

    If you use code SIR086, you’ll get $5 off your first order.

    I also have a list of where to buy supplies here if you’re looking for anything else:

    http://simplysugarandglutenfree.com/resources/

    [Reply]

  • Darlene McKeen

    posted on December 2, 2011 at 9:33 am

    Hi, Amy. A friend just forwarded me the link to a bread recipe that you posted Feb, 2011. One of my children is sensitive to tapioca starch/flour. She gets horrible stomach aches if even the smallest amount is in a recipe! That complicates a gluten/dairy free diet because tapioca starch is in almost every recipe/box mix that you find. I don’t like corn starch as a substitute. What can I substitute for tapioca starch in the above flour blend (the top one)? Increase the potato starch?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Darlene McKeen, I think that increasing the potato starch would make the final product too dense. Instead of thinking of avoiding tapioca starch as difficult, I suggest looking at what your daughter can eat and choosing from that list. I would suggest cornstarch – I’m sure you can find a non-gmo brand out there. Other lighter flours include rice flour – Authentic Foods makes a really good, finely ground sweet rice flour that might work. When you start making substitutions, it’s a process of trial and error. Wish I had a cut and dry answer for you.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Dianna Payne

    posted on December 31, 2011 at 5:34 pm

    Hi Amy :)
    Like so many others, I’m so happy to find you. I just ordered your book and I may find the answer within it, but I’m anxious to start with some of your recipes now :) I’m allergic to beans,what can I substitute? Would oat flour work? Any help would be appreciated…tired of failing :o
    Dianna

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Dianna Payne, You can try oat flour or quinoa flour. Another option would be buckwheat flour but it’s got a heavier taste. I haven’t tried them so you’ll have to play around and see what you like best.
    xoxo,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • jolee

    posted on January 8, 2012 at 9:39 pm

    I am very new to the gf world but am starting to explore. my bestie and i are getting together next week end to make bread and a couple of other treats, and brainstorm. one of my other friends gave me a huge bag of chia seeds. just wanted to pick your brain and see what you think about them. any advice is always welcome. thanks:)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @jolee, I use chia seeds and love them. They’re great in smoothies and full of healthy omega fatty acids. Search for chia seeds in my toolbar to find recipes I use them in.

    Have fun!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kara

    posted on January 24, 2012 at 6:09 pm

    I just found your site and boy am I loving all these recipes, can’t wait to start cooking! I have a question, I am in desperate need of an all-purpose flour blend but we have severe allergies to beans, corn and rice. I have been trying for over a year to find a good blend but without much success. Do you have any recommendations for a flour blend without those? Oh how my poor child would like to have bread again. Thanks

    [Reply]

  • Crystal Krause

    posted on January 30, 2012 at 1:02 pm

    Hi Amy, I was sure to read all the post before asking! :) I have to do quite a bit of substitutions myself. Is it possible to get the weights for the flours in your ‘Amy’s Basic Flour Blend (Sorghum-Garfava Blend)’ recipe. I find that’s better for swapping flours and starches around, than going by cups.

    Thanks in advance!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Crystal Krause,
    4 cups (480 grams) garbanzo-fava bean flour
    4 cups (452 grams) sorghum flour
    2 cups (324 grams) potato starch
    1 1/3 cups (156 grams) tapioca starch

    Happy baking!

    [Reply]

  • melinda

    posted on February 23, 2012 at 11:18 pm

    hi. thanks for all the info on your website. i had a couple questions about the flour mixes…

    first, I am mostly concerned about the glycemic index on flours, so I think the sorghum and garbanzo/fava flour mix is great, low impact on blood sugar, right? my concern is with the potato starch and tapioca starch. why two different starches and do you think I could substitute arrowroot for both potato and tapioca, because I hear arrowroot has a lower GI, or am I thinking of it wrong, as in the mix won’t work that way, or is the tapioca really not bad on the glycemic index.

    and the second question is under that recipe it says “For the Garbanzo-garfava variation: substitute garbanzo bean flour for sorghum flour”…is that a variation you use in a lot of recipes or certain types of recipes? maybe I just haven’t seen or noticed it….i thought you said the first one works in nearly everything….just don’t want to purchase garbanzo bean flour in addition unless there’s a reason to substitute it for the sorghum in certain types of recipes.

    thanks!

    [Reply]

    Cat Reply:

    @melinda,

    I know it’s been awhile since this was being discussed, but I am just coming across this page and am wondering the same as Melinda.

    [Reply]

  • Farzana

    posted on March 20, 2012 at 2:43 pm

    Hi Amy !! I love your website. So informative for those starting to go gluten free (due to allergy) In regards to the basic flour blend with the sorghum . . . do you think I can use half sorghum and half quinoa or buckwheat? Have you ever tried? Also instead of the bean flour you mention, can I use soy instead? I cant stand the smell of the other bean flours ! Trust me, I tried LOL !!! xoxo

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on May 4, 2012 at 12:25 pm

    Amy,
    First of all very happy for you and your little one, I know your having the time of your life. But becareful there grown before you know it.
    I wanted to ask is there any thing that you can replace brown rice flour for?
    Thanks
    Molly

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, I would try quinoa flour, garbanzo bean flour, or garbanzo-fava bean flour. The last option has the mildest flavor.

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on May 5, 2012 at 12:19 am

    Would that also be the same for just Rice Flour?????
    or Sweet rice flour??????
    Thanks,
    Molly

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, I’m not sure what your question is…can you rephrase please?

    [Reply]

  • Molly

    posted on May 9, 2012 at 9:39 pm

    I sorry, I was talking about replacing the brown rice flour and received your answer about that. But was wondering would that be the same replacment for Rice Flour & Sweet rice flour.
    Thanks, Again
    Molly

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Molly, You can try it but it wouldn’t be my first choice. I would choose something white and starchy. Whenever you start replacing flours you end up with a different result. You’ll just have to go through a trial and error process.

    [Reply]

  • George

    posted on June 5, 2012 at 11:40 pm

    hi Amy i am first time here i read some of your people commets i like what you was saying i did not go true all of them but anyway i am looking for gf flour with high of protein , for bread, ( i am diabetic) thank you.

    [Reply]

  • Melissa

    posted on July 20, 2012 at 2:14 pm

    I love Ruben sandwiches. However, since I have to eat GF now I am having a hard time finding a bread that compares to Jewish Rye. Do you have any suggestions? I was thinking about adding flax seeds or chia seeds to a basic loaf of GF bread. What do you think about that ideas?

    Thanks for your blog and website, it has made my life so much more enjoyable!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Melissa, Try caraway seeds. Love them!
    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Diana

    posted on October 6, 2012 at 6:45 am

    I’m new to the GF world. My 16 y/old son & I both have Celiac Disease. He is the WORLDS PICKIEST EATER (& now I know why…poor kid, his whole life he’s had “tummy troubles”) I am hoping & praying that this new diet (we’ve been GF for one week now) I’m praying he gets better quickly on the GF diet.

    Is TAPIOCA STARCH the same as TAPIOCA FLOUR?

    Thank you for this wonderful website, I can see me spending a lot of time here learning!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Diana, Yes, they’re the same thing. Sending wishes to you and your son – it’s a big change but it’s completley worth it.

    [Reply]

  • JEAN EMNOTT

    posted on October 18, 2012 at 11:16 am

    AMY- I would like BASIC SOUP RECIPES FROM 10-16-12 THANK YOU JEAN

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @JEAN EMNOTT, I’m not sure what you mean?? Can you please explain?

    [Reply]

  • Roseann

    posted on December 5, 2012 at 9:53 pm

    In your book “Simply Sugar and Gluten Free” alot of the recipes for cookies and cakes use palm sugar. Is there a way to convert it to agave or xylitol? Would the liquids or flours need to be adjusted because agave and xylitol takes up less mass and is a liquid rather than sugar?

    [Reply]

  • Joy

    posted on March 9, 2013 at 5:10 pm

    Amy, I have a corn allergy & recently discovered that I need to go gluten free as well. Do you know if it would work to substitute potato starch for cornstarch in your all purpose flour recipe? I look forward to baking with your flour substitutes.

    [Reply]

    Tammy Reply:

    Joy, You can substitute arrowroot for cornstarch and it should work just fine.

    [Reply]

  • Natarsha Lambie

    posted on June 17, 2013 at 9:05 am

    I love your site. I’m increasingly interested in having a wheat free and sugar free diet. Since having my Thermomix I can make so many lovely flours from scratch, extra fine, in super quick time. Thermomix is a high powered blender and cooking and steaming machine. It’s exact temperature settings are brilliant for raw food diets as well as everyday cooking for whole family. I demonstrate it for free in London UK if anyone is interested. Seeing is believing and taste is everything.

    [Reply]

  • Amanda

    posted on June 27, 2013 at 9:23 am

    For your Basic Flour Blend, could you please tell me the measurements of flours by weight, rather than volume? I noticed you gave them by weight in the Perfect Bread recipe, and I want to be as accurate as possible. I’m looking forward to trying this recipe. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Sonia

    posted on July 30, 2013 at 5:51 pm

    Wow oh wow!! The Basic Flour Blend (Sorghum-Garfava Blend) is even low-medium oxalate!!!! Thank you!!!
    You’re a genius Amy!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sonia, It was a happy coincidence. But I’m thrilled that you’re thrilled. :)

    [Reply]

  • Connie

    posted on August 25, 2013 at 3:06 pm

    I just made this bread, and it looks lovely. But the taste is a little bitter. The sorghum flour that I used I bought last Christmas time, could it be bad (I haven’t refrigerated it)? I also used xanthum gum that I had not refrigerated (and is probably older still). I don’t really do a lot of baking, but our house is primarily gluten free. So, wondered if you could give some guidance on what flours/starches need to be refrigerated. Thanks so much!

    Connie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Connie, I don’t refrigerate my sorghum or xanthan gum. The packages should tell you if you should refrigerate them. It could be that your flour is rancid. Do you still have it?

    [Reply]

  • Trisha

    posted on November 18, 2013 at 10:23 am

    Hi Amy!

    I’ve decided to start a GF lifestyle based on constant digestive issues and bloating. I’ve been searching for Flour blends as I like to make homemade pizza at least once a week. Which of your blends would you recommend? Also, if it isn’t listed in the recipe how much xanthan gum would I need to add? I am brand spanking new to GF and I realize it’s going to take a lot of trial and error, but it’s worth it :)

    [Reply]

  • Melodie Kantner

    posted on December 19, 2013 at 1:20 pm

    I am really appreciating the recipes. I have been trying to stay more gluten free since I feel better and sleep better when I stay away from gluten. I will try some of these flour blends.

    [Reply]

  • Cheri Reynolds

    posted on April 17, 2014 at 2:25 pm

    I’m anxious to try your basic flour blend. As a long time ww bread baker (plus pizza dough, cheese bread and so forth!) I know I will miss bread as I try to go GF. My question is: Is there a particular reason you use garbanzo beans? Would any bean do, such as pinto or navy? I have a lot of different beans in storage and I can grind them into flour in my Blend Tec wheat grinder. Thank you.

    Cheri Reynolds

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Cheri Reynolds, No reason at all – I don’t grind my own flours so I use what I can get at the store.

    [Reply]

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