• Zoe

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 9:44 am

    I watched your video yesterday in my YouTube subscriptions and I found it very informative. I’m not exactly new anymore to using a scale but I think it’s great for those who haven’t used a scale before or they’re still getting their bearings. It also clearly demonstrates the tare function, which I thought was confusing when I read about it years ago. I needed it to be shown and demonstrated to me in order to get it. It’s so easy…and kind of fun, too. Well done, Amy!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Zoe, Thanks, Zoe. Yes, the tare function can be confusing if you’ve never seen it before. It doesn’t quite make sense if you’re not used to using a scale. I agree – once you see it, it’s so simple.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Christianne

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 9:50 am

    Hi Amy! I love your video! How is it you make everything look so easy? Thank you for this simple yet informative step by step clip. Zeroing out the the bowl and each flour is brilliant:)
    And of course you are simply adorable as well as sugar and gluten free!

    BTW, my 9 year old neice had the time of her life making and eating your Socca pepperoni and cheese pizza from your new book yesterday! Her mom who is not even gluten free is ordering it!

    Hope to see more videos

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christianne, Love to you as always, Christianne! Thank you for sharing my book with your family. I have more plans for videos in the future. :)

    [Reply]

    Christianne Reply:

    @Amy, Tons of love back to you and I am ordering the scale today from your” Resources” link as soon as i post this!

    [Reply]

    Christianne Reply:

    @Christianne,
    Amy this doesn’t look like the same scale you use in your video. Have you changed it out and which do you prefer. Thanks in advance. I hate to order one that may not be as versatile.

    Amy Reply:

    @Christianne, The one in the video is an OXO scale I got at Bed, Bath & Beyond. I also have the EatRight scale – they’re both great. The EatRight Scale is more precise and offers grams, kilograms, ounces, and pounds whereas the OXO scale only offers kilograms and pounds – the displays just read differently.

    The OXO scale has a pull out display which makes it easier to read if you’re using a huge bowl. But, I have never been in a situation where I can’t read my EatRight scale. That’s the one I use in school.

    The EatRight scale is also $15 cheaper than the OXO scale. It’s just a matter of what you prefer. Either one will do the job.

  • Celina

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 10:00 am

    Just got your book in the mail yesterday!!!

    So here’s what I’m wondering (and hopefully I haven’t missed where this is already addressed!): When baking with conventional wheat flours I am used to measuring my flour by weight – especially when making yeast breads. With gluten free flour blends is this still recommended? Is there a general rule? Should I just fluff the flour with a spoon and spoon it into my measuring cup?

    I made GF SF pancakes the other day and I measured by just scooping and leveling off the measuring cup – the pancakes were good but dense. That got me thinking about all of this . . . :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Celina, There’s a section in my book about baking tips – pages 222 – 223 that tells you exactly how I measure. Fluff, spoon into the measuring cup, then level off. Don’t scoop the measuring cup into the flour. What recipe did you use for the pancakes?

    Thanks for ordering my book! :)

    [Reply]

  • Heather

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    Bought your book…just waiting for it to arrive.
    Thanks so much for posting this, I’m new to GF SF diet, and was just trying to find a “recipe” for the flour. Thanks! :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Heather, Thank you, Heather! Let me know what your favorite recipes are…the Socca Pizza and the Chocolate Sour Cream Cupcakes have been getting lots of attention lately. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Nana Rogers

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 12:38 pm

    Amy, you are an amazing woman!
    Thank you so much for this information. Now I have to get a good scale ;P
    (((Hugs))) April

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Nana Rogers, Thanks, April. If you go to my resource page there’s a link to the scale I use in school…it’s a great little scale and very affordable.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Francine

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 1:17 pm

    I can’t do flava or beans, so I guess I need an alternative flour for that one in your mis recipe. any suggestions? I can do the rest with no problem. Thanks for the information. I will try this mix.

    HUGS

    Francine

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Francine, Hi Francine, A handful of my recipe testers used brown rice flour instead of garbanzo-fava flour in the recipes and had great results. I suggest Authentic Foods because it’s ground really fine and not at all gritty.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie Mckenzie

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 1:45 pm

    Love your video and the fact that using a scale is so much less messy than using measuring cups, thanks for showing us how it’s done!!

    [Reply]

  • Aamina

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 7:58 pm

    Great video. Very informative and to the point :)

    [Reply]

  • Jeanine

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 8:13 pm

    Yeah! Great video, Amy! Informative video (and we have the same coffee maker, hehe).

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeanine, Did you get your coffee maker at Costco?

    [Reply]

    Jeanine Reply:

    @Amy, No, Canadian Tire, but saw it at Costo 2 weeks ago for quite a bit less than I paid. :P Ah well, I still love it. :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jeanine, That’s happened to me so many times when I buy things from Costco. I’ve learned to do my research first most of the time. I finally broke down and bought the Phillips SonicCare toothbrushes and we love them!

  • Nicole Hunn

    posted on March 31, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    I think it’s wonderful that you’re doing videos for these sort of things. There really aren’t enough how-to videos on gluten-free baking. I think it’s a real gap in the wealth of information out there, and I’m glad you’re helping to fill it.
    Warm regards,
    Nicole

    [Reply]

  • Angel7

    posted on April 1, 2011 at 9:42 am

    Thank you for giving us instructions on how to make a gluten-free flour blend! I am all about being cost-effective!

    [Reply]

  • Shawna Luciano

    posted on April 1, 2011 at 9:47 am

    Nice! Can we look forward to more YouTube from you! I’m so enjoying your new cookbook!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Shawna Luciano, Hi Shawna! Yes, I’m working on more YouTube videos. Glad you’re enjoying the new cookbook. I’d love to hear what you think about the recipes.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Ashlie

    posted on April 3, 2011 at 8:05 pm

    You are so great at comming up with all-purpose recipes and providing practical tips. I also know that you have been taking some fancy baking classes – so, I was wondering if you have tried making sugar free almond paste. I know it is typically made with a sugar-based syrup, do you think honey or agave would work? I love almond horn cookies and I really want to try to make some sugar free ones!!! Thanks in advance for any advice you have to offer :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ashlie, Not yet, Ashlie. I’ve thought about it but haven’t had time to play around with it yet. I don’t know if agave would work or not. You might try it and see what you think.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Erika

    posted on April 4, 2011 at 12:13 am

    Are sorghum flour and sweet white sorghum flour the same thing?

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Erika, Great question. Yes, they are. Bob’s Red Mill is the brand I use and it says “Sweet White Sorghum” on the packaging. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Erika Reply:

    @Amy, Oh good! I just wanted to double check before I make a batch of flour to try some recipes from your cookbook!!

    Thank you so much for the quick reply!

    ~Erika

    [Reply]

  • Zibi

    posted on April 8, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    I love this recipe! I eat mainly a paleo diet, which means no grains, but I’ve loosened up a little toward the end of my pregnancy and I love having this flour mixture around. I used it for overnight waffles (a birthday breakfast treat) and I’m about to use it for a pizza crust.

    I was always turned off of gluten free baking because the ingredient list was so long and I thought the ingredients were hard to find, but the premix makes it easier. Thank you so much for sharing :)
    Zibi

    [Reply]

  • Alexis R

    posted on April 10, 2011 at 6:06 pm

    Amy, Thank you for your great video on making you flour. Is this recipe an all purpose flour that can be used for muffins, cookies, pancakes?
    Thank you!
    Alexis

    [Reply]

  • Pat

    posted on September 23, 2011 at 11:38 am

    I’ve been using Bob’s Red Mill GF flour mixture as a subsitute for regular flour for ages. I even use it to fix fried chicken and make gravy. Gravy even thickens easier than regular flour.

    My question is: Will your blend work for these, too, or is it mainly to use with cakes, breads, pastries, etc.?

    Enjoying your site! Lots of hard work here…and it’s appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Pat, Yes, it generally works 1 to 1. :)

    [Reply]

  • Meghan

    posted on May 28, 2012 at 2:57 pm

    Thank you for posting this recipe, I am a huge baker and have been recently diagnosed with thyroid issues and my doctor recommended going gluten free so this will help soo much! I am heading to the store to buy your book today :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Meghan, Good luck with your new food adventure! Please let me know about your experience with my book.
    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Pingback: How To Make Gluten Free Flour Blends | my gluten free diet

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