• Linda

    posted on September 30, 2009 at 9:26 am

    I didn’t know I could just freeze it in jars. That is a big help. I didn’t want to mess with putting it in bags, so I would store it in the frig but often have to throw some out. Thank you, thank you for that tip. I usually make mine with a chicken carcass and cook it in the pressure cooker.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    When freezing in jars – use widemouth jars and leave more than enough space for the stock to expand. It doesn’t always expand evenly – sometimes it gets a little bump. You don’t want to crack a jar. (I’m telling you this from experience!!) I used to do the plastic bag thing and it’s always a big mess. The bags get little rips and then when I thaw it the stock leaks everywhere, plus it soaks up unwanted freezer flavors.

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  • Alta

    posted on September 30, 2009 at 10:21 am

    I love to have homemade stock. I don’t always do it, but usually, if I have a whole chicken, if I’m cutting it up (a lot of the time, when I roast a chicken, I cut the back out of it to roast it flat – spatchcocked – cooks faster), I save wings, backs, necks, and freeze until I have enough for stock. Never use a recipe, I’m more of a “dump and simmer” kinda gal. I have heard that using the rinds of Parmesan cheese adds a lot of body to the stock, I forgot last time!
    And I do want to ask you, when you’re using a whole chicken, and you pick the meat off, is it not dry? I have that trouble with the meat when making stock.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    No, the meat is so incredibly moist and delicious. I start with a raw chicken and cut off any huge hunks of fat, throw it in the pot, let it simmer for about 4 hours and the meat just melts in your mouth.

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  • Jessie at Blog Schmog

    posted on September 30, 2009 at 3:36 pm

    I’m learning something primative and new everyday. Is that an okay word to use?? :) I mean it in the nicest way, in fact the more “pioneer-ish” in my book the better. Once I cooked stew over a wood stove it was awesome. I’m going to try this I knew it was simple but have never completely done it (I use the drippings from the crock pot for stock). Can you can it?

    I’ve been freezing bags but I hate it, as you mentioned, it makes a mess and always leaks when thawing.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I am sure it’s possible to can it but I’d consult a canning book about the method. It’s so much easier for me to just freeze it.

    [Reply]

  • Melody Joy

    posted on September 30, 2009 at 5:24 pm

    I absolutely love cooking with homemade stock!

    Did you know that adding a tablespoon or so of vinegar will help draw the marrow out of the bones and make the stock even MORE nutrient dense? I pulled that tip from the book (and website) “Broth is Beautiful.”

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    No, I didn’t know that tip but thanks so much for sharing a great tip and another great book. I don’t have that one – yet. :)

    [Reply]

    Melody Joy Reply:

    No problem. I had a friend let me borrow it, and since then we’ve been making fresh stock on a regular basis (once a month or so), it tastes soooo much better than anything you could buy at the store!

    [Reply]

  • Liz@HoosierHomemade

    posted on September 30, 2009 at 7:42 pm

    I used some stock a couple days ago that I had in the freezer for some soup. Does it get kinda slimy, or was it because of the container I had it in?
    I like the jar idea. Thanks for sharing, Amy!
    ~Liz

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    My stock has never gotten slimy. If it was slimy could it have been fat that didn’t get strained? It’s hard to get every last bit of fat – maybe it was room temp chicken fat?

    [Reply]

    Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship Reply:

    Liz,
    Is it possible by “slimy” you mean the whole thing sort of “gelled” like loose jello? If so, you’re golden! That’s the gelatin from the bones, and it’s a signifier of super-healthy, can’t-buy-it-in-the-store-this-way, immunity-boosting stock! Well done. :)
    Katie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I didn’t think of it that way – I thought she meant slimy like nasty gross, not in the sense of gelatin from the bones. Thanks for that connection.

    [Reply]

    Liz@HoosierHomemade Reply:

    Thanks, yes, it was jelled, kinda yellowish golden, I never thought of it being from the bones. I’ve made stock tons of times, but never froze it. Now, I know just what to do.
    Thanks much girls!
    ~Liz

    [Reply]

    Cheri Reply:

    This is a great tip, because I made this stock for the first time and put it in the fridge. The next day it jelled and I was afraid to use it thinking I had done something wrong. It should still be good, so I’ll try using it tonight and freezing the rest. Thanks!

  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on October 1, 2009 at 6:06 am

    Wow, Amy, thanks so much for all the love! A link to my tortilla soup recipe (which I have to say is so easy and can be made with just about any veggies on hand) and being featured on your blog–that’s extremely kind of you. I am truly honored … thank you so very much!

    I make homemade chicken stock all the time. I usually do start with a roasted chicken carcass. It always amazes me how much wonderful meat one gets from the effort, too … meat that would have been missed othewise. I add vinegar like Melody Joy mentioned to pull out the calcium. I love simmering a carcass on the stove. Such heavenly smells and using every bit of the chicken! I don’t add much to mine, if anything, because the roasted chicken already has seasonings and great flavor, but your recipe looks incredible. :-) It’s definitely stock/soup weather here right now … quite nippy this morning!

    Thanks!
    Shirley

    [Reply]

  • Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen

    posted on October 1, 2009 at 10:26 am

    This is awesome, Amy! Yo know how much I love making stock too – I agree about it making you feel grounded and joyful. There is just something so wonderfully wholesome about it! :)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I know – it’s one of those things that you don’t understand until you actually make the stock and then cook with it.

    [Reply]

  • Brian

    posted on October 1, 2009 at 3:09 pm

    Fresh stock is great. I think I’m just too lazy to do it. There is a local company here in Oregon that sells a pretty good chicken stock. In fact, I think it’s available at Costco. http://www.pacificfoods.com/ Pacific Foods makes several GF soups and stocks.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    That’s what I buy if I’m in a pinch. I love that it’s organic, has a nice, clean flavor, and, when I do have to buy it, it’s much cheaper at Costco than anywhere else. It’s good but not as good as homemade, though.

    [Reply]

  • Ellen Allard

    posted on October 1, 2009 at 10:12 pm

    You’re right. There is nothing like homemade stock. And it’s so easy to make. Homemade stock (any type) enhances every and anything I make. Love the idea of freezing in the jars. I’ve been freezing my stock in freezer ziplocks and haven’t been happy, so I will try the jars. Thanks for the tip! Love your blog!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    So glad you like my blog – and thrilled to meet another like-minded stock maker. The ziplocs just don’t cut it when it come to frozen stocks or soups. I’m sure that there are good plastic containers to freeze it in, but I love the jars.

    [Reply]

  • Tina

    posted on October 2, 2009 at 11:09 am

    I am curious if anyone has a gluten, dairy and soy-free chicken pot pie recipe, that’s delicious!

    Tina

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I don’t but many people use coconut milk instead of dairy – it would give your pot pie a really unique flavor. Or check out godairyfree.com – you’ll find tons of fabulous dairy free recipes there.

    [Reply]

  • cheryl

    posted on October 2, 2009 at 8:18 pm

    chicken soup is just such a treat. it looks delish!

    [Reply]

  • Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship

    posted on October 5, 2009 at 7:09 pm

    Amy,

    What gorgeous photos you take. Please come to my house and photograph my food for me! ;)

    Actually, come on over to my blog on Thursday and link this post or your other stock posts up to my carnival – it’s homemade stock recipes this week, and I’d love to have you participate!
    Thanks
    Katie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    I will – thanks for the invite. And while we’re exchanging invites please drop in on Mondays for Slightly Indulgent Mondays- fabulous food made healthier. Anything a little healthier in any way goes – doesn’t have to be gluten-free or sugar-free.

    [Reply]

    Katie @ Kitchen Stewardship Reply:

    Amy, thanks! I almost linked up this week, but I wasn’t sure if it had to be GF or not. I’ll add it to my list o’ carnivals! Thanks for coming on over to KS for a visit. Hope to see you back again next week for the Super Foods carnival (which include basic things like garlic, onions, and apples). I’d love more GF recipes linked in b/c so many people struggle with gluten, and I often don’t know where to direct them (now I’ve got your blog!).

    Thanks a bunch!
    Katie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Thanks, Katie. Yes, please do link! And I appreciate the invite to include me in. For me it’s not about gluten-free or not gluten-free, sugar-free or not sugar-free but all about good food, good friends, and sharing our love for these things together.

  • Connie

    posted on March 2, 2011 at 3:29 pm

    Thank you Amy for your blog! I have just read a bit and am so happy to know someone else who is GF and SF! I’ve just been diagnosed Gluten intolerant and am very new at this. I’ve been making chicken stock for years and really appreciate seeing how others do it. I’ve added star anise and cinnamon sticks for a very lovely flavour for Chicken Soup.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Connie, I love star anise and cinnamon…never thought of adding them to my stock. Thanks for the yummy suggestion. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Maryanne

    posted on November 3, 2011 at 5:08 am

    So, just want to make sure: when I roast a chicken, I can just take the bones, pick the meat off (do I have to pick off the meat?), and use the cooked bones to make broth? I usually boil a whole chicken to get stock, but that gets really expensive using pastured chickens, and sometimes I just don’t want all that boiled meat. I love roasting chicken, so using those bones would be fantastic. All the broth recipes I’ve found use a whole chicken. Thanks for a great blog!

    [Reply]

  • Shela

    posted on September 16, 2013 at 9:33 pm

    Thanks for the recipe but how much water should be added to chicken

    [Reply]

  • Pat @ Elegantly, Gluten-Free

    posted on December 30, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    Your chicken broth looks so satisfying, and you can’t beat the cost — it’s so frugal! I’ve linked to this recipe of yours from my post today on Gluten-Free Navy Bean Soup.

    [Reply]

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