• Melie

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 9:56 am

    I have to admit that I’ve been a devoted almond flour fan for a while now. All the recipes that call for three or more flours make my head spin and my wallet hurt. This post is making me rethink that though. I do believe healthy eating is about giving the body what it needs and practicing moderation. I never considered my near exclusive use of almond flour as a divergence from that mantra. Thanks for the eye opener!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Melie, I don’t think that using a blend is more expensive than almond flour. It’s probably a bit cheaper….maybe a little more work though. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Chelsea @ Naturally Sweet Recipes

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 9:59 am

    I love almond flour, but really haven’t tried these others! They really interesting! I need to be more daring I guess. That cake sounds amazing, love the orange!

    [Reply]

  • Kate

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 10:37 am

    I’ve made a very similar recipe several times and it is a family favorite – even those who haven’t a clue about nutrition! You can use other citrus too or even combine different types. Meyer lemons in this are to die for…

    You can add in warm spices to your liking and even some (gasp) good, organic, pastured butter for even more moisture and healthy fats (and awesome flavor and mouth feel.)

    NOTE – crucial to use organic citrus – citrus is heavily loaded with pesticides and fungicides.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kate, This particular recipe doesn’t need any more moisture. It’s already really moist. But, I can see how butter would add great flavor.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Stephanie

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 11:07 am

    Hi Amy,

    As usual, you and I seem to be on the same page! When I began my GF journey, I fell in love with almond flour, but I quickly learned that it was too rich for my body — and my hips didn’t exactly appreciate the high calorie and fat content. As you know from my recipes, I have found a mix of garbanzo and almond (and arrowroot) to be a combination that works for me. I’ve recently been dabbling with coconut and buckwheat flours as well. You are exactly right — it’s all about balance and finding the right balance for your body.

    Thank you so much for all you do!

    Stephanie

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Stephanie, I’ve been playing around with coconut flour too. Love it. :)

    xoxo,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Ricki

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 11:24 am

    Sounds yummy–and so much great information about those flours! I also love my whole grains. Still haven’t tried almond flour–this may just be the time. :)

    [Reply]

  • Val Naegele

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 12:53 pm

    Amy: I would like to make this cake – if I didn’t want to use all almond, what would be a good portion to use of one of the other flours?

    Thank you,
    Val

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Val Naegele, You’d have to rework the recipe – you could replace some almond with other nut flours but if you want to go further than that it’s time to get out your apron and play in the kitchen.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • denise

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 1:16 pm

    I’ve used almond flour and really like it. I’ve used garbanzo flour quite a few times in different things and find that each item had too much of a chick pea flavor to it, that’s when I switched to the almond flour. Maybe the garbanzo/fava combo will lighten up the garbanzo flavor? I still want to try coconut flour as I like using other coconut products as replacements for the ‘typical’ milk and sugar.

    This cake sounds like a winner for the SB weekend to bring as a dish. I really enjoy citrus flavored desserts and I’m sure the other guests wouldn’t say “no” to it either!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @denise, I really like the garbanzo-fava bean flour because it is milder than chickpea. And, I like to use it in a blend with other flours. It gives great structure without the bean flavor.

    Here is my flour blend:
    http://simplysugarandglutenfree.com/my-basic-flour-blend/

    xoxo,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • kimberle

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 2:14 pm

    Hello, can I use 2 lemons in place of the oranges?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @kimberle, I haven’t tried it – you can give it a go and see how it works out. My first thought is that it might need more sweetener.

    [Reply]

  • Sabrina M.

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 3:32 pm

    This sounds A-mazing! I LOVE orange desserts so I am all over this cake as a candidate for Easter dessert. I’m curious to replace some of the orange with some Rio ruby grapefruit . . .

    [Reply]

  • Brandon

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 3:41 pm

    Glad to see a really thorough nutritional analysis on these gluten-free flours! I use them constantly, practically exclusively, in all of my baked goods. Being a nutrition major, I really do enjoy this post!

    I’ve been using coconut flour for around three years now, and will never use any other gluten-free flour for cakes or breads. It is not only slightly nourishing, but it’s also a better source of fiber and tastes better (in my opinion) than garbanzo bean flour, which I usually just use in small amounts (like in cookies).

    Coconut flour also helps me add a little more protein to my foods, because it really needs more moisture from eggs. I’ve tried it with cookies, with only moderate success, but will continue to use it for cakes, cupcakes and gluten-free sweet and savory breads.

    [Reply]

  • InTolerant Chef

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 3:49 pm

    Yumm! I made a very similar recipe this week with whole mandarins, palm sugar and almond meal. So lovely. I find it difficult to get almond flour here anywhere but coconut flour is readily accessible.

    [Reply]

  • Alisa

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 5:33 pm

    What a wonderfully simple cake Amy!

    I felt for a while like my body needed more fat, but then realized that the nut flours (mostly almond) were really doing a number on my gut. I’ve heard that from others too. I’m still using nuts in baking, but cutting them half with other nutrient-dense flours and it seems to work better for me. We’re all so different!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Alisa, I can see how that would happen. I agree with you – we are all so different and we have to find what works for us. That’s part of what I love about the “special diets” (I don’t love that term…) community – we all seem to honor the differences in each other.

    [Reply]

  • Arlee

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 8:17 pm

    This recipe is so similar to Elanas Orange Cake recipe http://www.elanaspantry.com/orange-cake/

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Arlee, I haven’t seen Elana’s orange cake. As noted above, I adapted this recipe from Martha Rose Shulman’s Every Woman’s Guide to Eating During Pregnancy, published in 2002. Martha uses whole almonds and grinds them; I started with blanched almond flour. She used white sugar; I used powdered coconut palm sugar and reduced the amount. Martha is one of my food heroes – she’s an incredible force in the world of healthier cuisine. If you don’t have any of her books, I highly recommend them. She’s a genius.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

    Arlee Reply:

    Thanks for the recommendation! I really enjoyed Elana’s recipe and I will def. give your’s a try =)

    [Reply]

  • Jeanette

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 8:54 pm

    Amy, what a nice simple recipe – thanks for sharing. I do make cakes with almond flour as I find it makes a nice moist crumb, however, given its high calorie count, I like to mix it with other gluten-free flours. Thanks for the information.

    [Reply]

  • Lexie @ Lexie's Kitchen

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 9:14 pm

    Amy, great overview of flours. Very helpful … your cake looks lovely!! xoLexie

    [Reply]

  • Kat

    posted on February 2, 2012 at 10:59 pm

    Thank you for this recipe! I am going to try it!!!

    [Reply]

  • Jeanene

    posted on February 3, 2012 at 8:30 am

    Hi Amy,

    Thank you for your wealth of information! You are amazing!
    Your cake looks yummy!
    I’m glad to hear that you are doing well in your pregnancy! I’m sure that you are getting so excited!
    I have been playing around in the kitchen with receipes but, then I don’t have time to get them to the blog. Ugggg!

    Hugs,
    Jeanie (Jeanene)

    [Reply]

  • Nancy

    posted on February 3, 2012 at 10:09 am

    Nice presentation, lovely cake recipe & great nutritional info, Amy.
    I made Elana’s orange cake this morning. (5am) I love almond flour due to the low carb fact which keeps the baked products total carb extremely lower that the grain flour. I am extremely sensitive to carbs be it fruit sugar, added sugar or starches so I have to maintain a low consumption.
    I eat higher fat in the a.m. for good long lasting energy. Lean meals later in the day. If I over do it one day, I create the deficit the next day. Balance, right!
    You helped me realize the sugar in my diet was the culprit of how yucky I was feeling.
    You go to extreme lengths to make sure the world learns to be healthier.
    Nice Job!
    Thanks again!
    Nancy

    [Reply]

  • Sarah

    posted on February 5, 2012 at 9:37 pm

    I’ve been a longtime reader of your blog, though I rarely comment. I saw this recipe and just got so hungry to try it! It turned out delicious (though I used unbleached almond flour, because I didn’t think I had blanched–found it later). My family liked it, too. Thanks so much for the yummy recipe!!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sarah, Hi Sara! Glad you decided to say hi. Yes, this cake is yummy. I really enjoyed it. It’s great that your family enjoyed it, too.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Allison

    posted on February 13, 2012 at 6:49 pm

    Being allergic to nuts and bean flours I will migrate for anything that is not a starch nor rice flour product. I wish gluten free manufacturers used more sorghum, quinoa, amaranth and teff because they at least have nutrients as opposed to the rice flours…

    [Reply]

  • Angelique

    posted on February 15, 2012 at 3:02 pm

    Is there any reason not to substitute something else for the coconut sugar? My daughter is allergic to coconut. I normally use unrefined cane sugar. Is there any reason not to use that?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Angelique, I can’t eat cane sugar so I don’t use any cane sugar products. Clearly, you need to make the choice that is best for your daughter. There are many reasons I love coconut palm sugar but if your daughter is allergic it’s not something you want to introduce.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • stacy

    posted on March 22, 2012 at 4:26 pm

    Can we use stevia in place of coconut palm sugar?

    [Reply]

  • rena

    posted on April 2, 2012 at 8:00 pm

    Hi Amy,

    On top of being gluten intolerant, I am also sugar intolerant. The higher protein flours have worked well for me. While the rice and potato flours have left me with some not so pleasant side effects.

    [Reply]

  • karen button

    posted on May 13, 2012 at 9:16 am

    I did this today and it turned out great. I added a little organic fruitspread apricot. Then drizzled the chocolate. yummy! Thanks for the great recipes. Happy moms day.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @karen button, Yea! Thanks for sharing! And, thank you for the Mom’s Day wishes!
    xoxo

    [Reply]

  • Lucy

    posted on April 7, 2014 at 6:48 am

    Hi just made this yummy treat, how long would you say it keeps for?

    [Reply]

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