• Lauren

    posted on February 17, 2010 at 11:24 pm

    It looks just fantastic. Not much more to say than that. Its beautiful. Looks like wheat.

    [Reply]

  • SnoWhite

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 6:29 am

    Awesome post! Can’t wait to share this with a GF friend.

    [Reply]

  • Alta (Tasty Eats At Home)

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 7:40 am

    Karina is a life-saver when it comes to breads. I recently tried her recipe – and it’s the best one I’ve baked so far. I don’t have a bread machine, but it still came out well. I love your version. It’s gorgeous. Now I want a sandwich.

    [Reply]

  • Jenna @ Newlyweds

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 7:59 am

    This bread looks delicious, I’d love to try it but not sure if I can find any buckwheat flour any suggestions for a substitute?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Jenna @ Newlyweds, Amazon.com carries buckwheat flour but I’m sure you could sub many things – use more sorghum or millet, add some cornmeal. It just depends on the taste you’re going for.

    [Reply]

  • Aubree Cherie

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 8:05 am

    I think you’ve named this recipe perfectly; it looks absolutely perfect for making sandwiches! I don’t have all the ingredients you’ve used in your recipe, but it looks amazing!

    ~Aubree Cherie

    [Reply]

  • Mom

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 8:46 am

    Your hamburger buns worked great even with all my substitutions. It’s almost tempting fate to try a whole loaf given how badly some of mine have turned out. I do plan to try this – and thanks for posting it!

    [Reply]

  • Jessica Meyer

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 10:44 am

    Looks great Amy!

    [Reply]

  • Iris

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 1:58 pm

    Wow! That is one good looking bread!

    [Reply]

  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 4:50 pm

    It looks fantastic, Amy! I can’t do all those flours, but it’s wonderful for folks who can eat those.

    Shirley

    [Reply]

  • jamie

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 6:05 pm

    my sister was just told by her doctor to avoid hydrolized/commercial yeast too. could you do this with a starter? apparently natural yeasts are ok for her. thanks heaps! it looks amazing.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @jamie, I’ve never used a sourdough starter. If you try it I’d love to know how it works out.

    [Reply]

    jamie Reply:

    @Amy, well, a project for the week it shall be! i will certainly let you know. :) thanks!

    [Reply]

  • deeba

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 7:06 pm

    Nothing like a hearty good bread …. this looks fabulous Amy! SU’d!!

    [Reply]

  • Katrina (gluten free gidget)

    posted on February 19, 2010 at 7:08 am

    I love this recipe! I normally have to omit the egg, change 1 or 2 of the flours, and I use non-dairy milk. I also cook it about 5 minutes longer. I’ve made a vegan version as well that was awesome!

    [Reply]

  • Michelle Szames

    posted on February 19, 2010 at 9:48 pm

    What kind of buckwheat flour do you use? I just bought Bobs Red Mill but based on my internet searches it does not appear to be gluten free. I need to stay gluten free due to a gluten sensitivity. Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Michelle Szames, Buckwheat is gluten-free naturally. I’m surprised that Bob’s Red Mill would do something to contaminate a naturally gluten-free food. You might call them. They’re wonderful – I’ve called before. If you do talk to them, I’d love to know what they say.

    I use Arrowhead Mills buckwheat flour which has a gluten-free symbol on the label.

    [Reply]

    Michelle Reply:

    @Amy, Well I called the company and the buckwheat flour is not produced in the gluten free room so they can not label it gluten free. I made the bread with it anyway since I had already purchased it and I didnt have a problem. Next time I will by the Arrowhead Mills. BTW – the bread was AMAZING. I am so excited!! I love your blog. Thank you so much for all of your recipes and wisdom on gluten and sugar free.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Michelle, Thank you, Michelle! That’s great info. It gets complicated in the processing plant, doesn’t it?

    So glad you like the bread. The buckwheat makes such a difference in the final texture. Hugs to you.

  • Ann

    posted on February 22, 2010 at 11:38 am

    Your bread machine makes a 1, 1-1/2 and 2 pound loaves. Mine only makes a 1-pound loaf. Do you know if this recipe would work without adjustments in my breadmaker? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Ann,I wish I had an answer for that – I can tell you that the baked loaf doesn’t fill up my bread pan in the machine. You’d have to try it. If you do, let us know how it works out.

    [Reply]

  • Sophie

    posted on February 22, 2010 at 1:14 pm

    Thanks for posting your tips! I have to admit, I usually resort to boxed breads, but I do miss something other than plain gf white bread… this looks like it’s really flavorful. I can definitely go for a sandwich made with this bread!

    [Reply]

  • deeba

    posted on February 23, 2010 at 11:11 pm

    I like the depth buckwheat adds to bread. This loaf is handsome!

    [Reply]

  • Barbara

    posted on February 24, 2010 at 5:46 am

    I make whole grain bread every week but have never tried a totally gluten-free version. Next on my list! Many thanks for this great looking recipe.

    [Reply]

  • Almost Slowfood

    posted on February 24, 2010 at 12:25 pm

    Nothing like a wonderful sandwich bread. Thanks for the recipe!

    [Reply]

  • megan

    posted on February 24, 2010 at 4:51 pm

    It’s a beautiful loaf!

    [Reply]

  • ann fine

    posted on April 13, 2010 at 3:44 pm

    I’m on a totally sugar free way of eating. I follow Kathleen DesMaisons program called Radiant Recovery for sugar-sensitive people. Can I make this bread without the agave? Thanking you in advance for your reply. Sincerely, Ann Fine

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @ann fine, I’ve never tried it so I can’t tell you what the result would be. The agave adds moisture. If you substitute something, add a product that will serve the same function.

    [Reply]

  • Jennifer

    posted on July 15, 2010 at 8:58 am

    Question.

    I have apple cider vinegar but have not been able to find cider vinegar. Can I use the apple cider?

    [Reply]

    Eric Reply:

    @Jennifer, I just made this bread and I used apple cider vinegar. The bread came out just fine, it doesn’t taste like apples. :)

    I also had to substitute millet flour since I couldn’t find any nearby, but brown rice flour worked just great. Would like to try millet flour if I ever get my hands on it, to compare.

    I hope my friend approves of this bread, tomorrow. *fingers crossed*

    [Reply]

  • Gabrielle

    posted on July 26, 2010 at 7:56 pm

    Hi Amy,
    I made this bread today in my new bread machine. It turned out great and it tastes delicious. I’m so happy that I have a delicious GF bread for sandwiches after my first attempt with a different recipe turned out disastrous. It didn’t’ rise as much as yours, it’s completely flat, maybe because I took out the paddle too soon and then in a panicked state had to try to put it back in when it started mixing again, but it still tastes great.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Gabrielle, I’m not sure what happened…I think it must have been the paddle incident. If you try it again, make notes of what you did. That way, if it doesn’t work we can trouble shoot. At least it tastes good, right. :)

    [Reply]

    Gabrielle Reply:

    @Amy,
    Thanks for reply Amy.
    I made another loaf today. I subtracted 1 tbsp of water and 1 tbsp of rice milk, then added 1tsp of water when it was mixing. I took the paddle out at the right time, but the bread sunk quite deep so there must of been an air bubble where the paddle was. Once again it did not rise the final time. I don’t want to subtract more water next time. Maybe subtract a bit of flour or add more yeast? From what I have read, all bread machines are different. Mine is a cheap one by Sunbeam – maybe it’s the bread machine. I haven’t used the quick bake cycle though. I’ve just used basic setting.
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Gabrielle, You can’t bake this bread using the regular loaf cycle with a rise and punch down. You have to do it on a quick cycle. Since there’s no gluten, the air to make the bread rise has to be trapped in the xanthan gum, which gets ‘developed,’ for lack of a better word, when it’s mixed for several minutes in the beginning.

    It sounds like what’s happening is that you’re looking for a second rise and it just won’t happen with this recipe. That’s why I use the Rapid Rise cycle on my bread maker. :)

    Yes, all bread machines are different and you have to make adjustments. The recipe works as written so don’t change it. Run your bread machine with nothing in it to see how it function on the Quick Bake cycle – it it mixes the bread for several minutes (about 3 – 5) it might just work.

  • Barbara

    posted on August 3, 2010 at 7:32 am

    Hi I am so happy to have found a sugar free gluten free bread that looks so nice!! I hope it looks that nice when I attempt to make it!! I don’t have bread maker, is it still possible to get the same result in the oven???

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Barbara, Yes, I’ve had people tell me that they bake in a loaf pan at 350 degrees for about 45 mins to an hour (until done) and it works great. You do have to mix it in a mixer on low until combined and then on high for about 3 minutes – it’s much different than a traditional bread in that regard.

    I haven’t tested it, though, so I don’t have a tried and true recipe of my own. Hugs!

    [Reply]

  • Gabrielle

    posted on August 5, 2010 at 9:45 pm

    Thanks for letting me know about the quick cycle because I would never of figures this out. The bread does rise a lot the first time and after that not at all. Great. I’ll be making bread this wknd.

    [Reply]

  • Gabrielle

    posted on August 18, 2010 at 10:06 pm

    Hi Amy,
    I finally succeeded at making bread! I used the quick cycle on my bread machine and it worked beautifully.

    [Reply]

  • Saundra

    posted on September 7, 2010 at 1:37 am

    Since my bread always tends to fall when baking it in my bread machine, I let the bread machine do the mixing and then put it in a loaf pan for baking. I get better results that way. However, my bread machine is quite old — I’ve had it and used it for years.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Saundra, I have pondered that and thought it might work better. Then again, I could really just mix it in my KitchenAid and not mess with the bread maker at all. I’m not much of a bread eater so I don’t bake it often enough to experiment. It’s on my ‘someday’ list. :)

    [Reply]

  • francine

    posted on December 24, 2010 at 12:37 pm

    if you put molassess in your mix it will get rid of the grey color with using buckwheat flour.

    [Reply]

  • Sandra

    posted on January 5, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Hello!
    I have finally purchased my breadmaker to make your bread but previously tried it with a friends BM (found out the fast bake didn’t work until after I had all ingredients in it so used the regular bake) and then with my new one on rapid bake (and altered using almond milk and brown rice flour instead of buckwheat). I can’t tell if it is the size it is supposed to be or not. Could you tell me how large the loaf is when you make it in dimensions?
    Your recipe reminded me of the round malt bread we used to eat growing up (not so much with the changes I made to the second loaf)
    Tx
    Sandra

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sandra, I wish I had the dimensions – but it’s just the size of the loaf pan that it’s baked in. It does rise to the top if that’s what you’re asking. Let me know if it’s not.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Sandra

    posted on January 5, 2011 at 9:19 pm

    Oh thanks Amy, maybe you can tell me what the max size loaf your breadman is and I think mine is up to 2 1/2 lbs and can gauge it by that comparison. Mine did not rise to the top, maybe 1/2 to 2/3rds.

    Tx Amy

    Sandra

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Sandra, My Breadman makes up to a 2 pound loaf. The setting I use doesn’t let you choose any options, though.

    Hope that helps.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Trish

    posted on February 3, 2011 at 11:30 pm

    Amy, is there something else that can be used in place of buckwheat? I follow my blood type diet (Eat Right for Your Type), which has proven to be every bit as beneficial as going GF and free of refined sugars, and unfortunately being type AB I cannot digest buckwheat very well. I also do not do well with most of the bean flours or tapioca starch. I have found I do best with rice flours, potato starch, millet, quinoa, arrowroot, and almond is okay, too…and oats! Thank you!!
    Trish xx

    [Reply]

  • Ali

    posted on May 7, 2011 at 12:53 am

    I love that you are gluten free and sugar free. I have noticed how much sugar affects me….I do also seem to have trouble with migraines from agave do you have a suggestion for a replacement?

    [Reply]

    Trish Reply:

    @Ali, Have you ever tried palm sugar? It’s a bit on the pricey side if you purchase from the health food stores, but I know of a few people using it and saying it’s working well for them in terms of blood sugar balance, of course used in moderation. I would recommend Xylitol, but I don’t think it will work to activate with the yeast in the bread. Honey would be the next best thing. Just make sure you purchase a local brand that you trust.

    [Reply]

    Ali Reply:

    @Trish, Can you replace the buckwheat with other flours such as brown rice flour or gf oat flour?

    [Reply]

    Trish Reply:

    @Ali, Not totally sure about the oat flour–my experience is that it produces a chewier product, so I only use it recipes that require it. But I see no problem with swapping out for brown rice flour. I use a GF bread recipe that also calls for buckwheat flour, but I cannot have it because of my AB blood type (don’t digest it well), and it works just fine, especially since there’s a good mix of other flours. HTH

    Amy Reply:

    @Ali, It all depends what you can tolerate. I know lots of people like local honey but I can only tolerate it in small amounts. The same with maple syrup. You can also try brown rice syrup, yacon syrup (expensive!!), and coconut sap nectar.

    Hugs!
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Gaile

    posted on September 5, 2011 at 11:11 am

    I can’t eat potato what could be used in place of the potato starch in this bread?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Gaile, Try tapioca starch or arrowroot starch. :)

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • lauren

    posted on March 29, 2012 at 4:58 pm

    I can’t wait to try this recipe, finally one with whole grains! My bread machine (Cusinart 100 model) has a gluten-free setting and a rapid bake setting, should I still stick with the rapid one?

    [Reply]

  • Christy

    posted on April 21, 2012 at 4:33 pm

    Hello! I love the flavor of this bread recipe, but have a question. The first time I tried making it in the oven, it came out great, but the next two times were a disaster. Both times the bread appeared to rise and form a nice crust (it looked like a perfect loaf of bread), but when it cooled and I cut into it, the middle was hollow! Only the top layer of bread had risen, and the rest of the dough stayed a big gunky layer at the bottom. Can you give me any idea as to why this might have happened? I’m pretty new to gluten free baking, so any advice offered would be apprecited.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Christy, I am not sure what you did differently the second and third time. I have never had a loaf come out hollow…so strange! I use this recipe in a bread machine – maybe there is a difference in how the bread rises? And, it sounds like there might have been too much liquid in the recipe.

    [Reply]

  • Marcelle

    posted on October 7, 2012 at 12:26 pm

    I have all the ingredients except the potato starch. Is there any thing I can substitute?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Marcelle, For bread I wouldn’t try to sub. Maybe arrowroot – but I can’t promise it will turn out. Bread is trickier than most other gluten-free baking.

    [Reply]

  • margaret clegg

    posted on January 4, 2013 at 7:20 pm

    Have you used mixes in your Breadman machine? I’ve usually just purchased Bob’s Red Mill and put it on program 1, but the center always fell. Right now I’m making the mix from King Arthur Flour. They’re suggesting some massively expensive breadmaker which has programmable times, with times of cycle: “preheat 15 minutes, knead 30 minutes, rise 65 minutes, bake 70 minutes, dark crust setting.” This baking time is more in line with the quick bread setting, program 6. I’d appreciate any insight you have. And thanks for your donation to the Lansing Gluten Free Fair. Hopefully you received a thank you card from whoever received your book. We’re already starting to prepare for this year’s fair!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @margaret clegg, I’m glad the donation was helpful.

    I haven’t tried any mixes. Let me know how your loaf turns out. I don’t use my bread machine much anymore because I’ve had better luck with my KitchenAid and letting the bread rise in a proofing box.

    I do love King Arthur, though. They make great gluten-free flour.

    [Reply]

  • Dawn

    posted on January 21, 2013 at 11:41 am

    I’m new to all of this. I just bought a bread maker and I’m “trying” to go 100% wheat free. It as difficult as going 100% sugar free. There is so much wheat and sugar added into SOOOOO many foods. It can make your head hurt. Anyway, I made this bread in my new bread maker with one substitution, because I only thought I had millet flour, I used oat flour. It came out looking just like your picture. I don’t know if it tastes the same but delicious is relative, and I thought it was delicious.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Dawn, Thanks for sharing your substitution! I will have to try that soon. I can see why oat flour would work. Smart!

    [Reply]

  • Shay

    posted on February 10, 2013 at 2:45 pm

    Hi Amy, I am used to making wheat bread in my bread machine, but know that our son has been diagnosed with celiacs I’m trying to make him some bread that isn’t made up of mostly rice flour. I came acrossed your recipe and am trying it right now. What threw me is how gooey the consistency of the dough is compared to normal wheat dough, since normal wheat dough is supposed to feel tacky but none should stick to your hands. Is this normal for gluten-free bread to be like brownie batter consistency? Just curious if I should keep adding flour or let it be…. Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Caitlin Reply:

    @Shay, in my experience, almost all gluten-free bread recipes are much closer to a cake batter (or brownie batter) consistency. I’ve only found one gluten-free bread recipe that is kneadable. :)

    [Reply]

  • Katie

    posted on September 21, 2013 at 3:27 pm

    How many pounds is this loaf? My breadmaker only does one pound loaves.

    [Reply]

  • Sara

    posted on March 11, 2014 at 6:25 pm

    I’m super interested in trying this recipe, but I don’t have a bread machine. Can anyone help with a recommendation for how long and at what temperature I can try baking this?

    [Reply]

  • Ms. Pris

    posted on March 22, 2014 at 10:29 pm

    I was excited about this recipe and then I saw the agave nectar. That’s heavily refined sugar. It has more fructose than HFCS.

    [Reply]

  • Texas Rose

    posted on September 17, 2014 at 12:50 am

    Will you please list the nutritional content? Particularly calories and fiber and sugars?

    [Reply]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>