• Celiacs in the House

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 8:38 am

    Oh, this sounds so good. I’ve been looking for new soup ideas and something with sausage.
    Wendy

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  • Lauren

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 9:00 am

    I’ve never had gumbo, but this sounds really yummy. In terms of the future of this, I say go with your gut. If you’re eating a lot of soups, show us that. The best recipes are always those made with love.

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    Amy Reply:

    That’s great feedback, and so very wise.

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  • Linda

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 9:36 am

    I don’t think any of us have ever had gumbo, so we wouldn’t know if it tasted right or not. I bet it would taste good though. Thanks for linking up.

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  • jen

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 10:55 am

    Oh my goodness it’s been so long since I’ve eaten gumbo… I wonder if I could manage this in the crockpot?

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    Amy Reply:

    Let me know if you do – and how it turns out. I am sure the chicken thighs would be great because they’re so moist. You could always use a slurry (arrowroot or cornstarch and water) to thicken it. I’d add the slurry at the end, turn it on high, take the lid off, and let it simmer to cook the slurry flavor out for 15 minutes or so.

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  • Ali @ The Whole Life Nutrition Kitchen

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 11:06 am

    This is a great post Amy, very informative on the cooking process. I haven’t made GF gumbo yet either but now I may try! Soups and stews at this time a year are a must! -Ali :)

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  • Jessie at Blog Schmog

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 1:58 pm

    I love your tutorial on roux! Thanks. I never learned to make roux before going gluten free so I had no idea it is different.

    I did not vote though I do like soups. What I most look for when I’m “surfing” recipes is EASY and I like make ahead meals too.

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    Amy Reply:

    Thanks for the feedback – it’s very helpful. So appreciate knowing what people find helpful and necessary.

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  • Jessie at Blog Schmog

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 1:58 pm

    p.s. I also liked your canning tips. I’m all about “from scratch” especially when it is easier than expected :)

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  • Diane-The WHOLE Gang

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 2:29 pm

    Great explanation of roux and the differences between gf and non gf and light and dark. Great info. Gumbo looks great!

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  • Liz@HoosierHomemade

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 6:33 pm

    I think soups are great. If that is way to cook, then share them. It a great meal in winter (even though I know your winter isn’t too cold)
    ~Liz

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    Amy Reply:

    It gets cold enough for us and one day a year it actually snows.

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  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on October 7, 2009 at 8:37 pm

    I agree with everyone else … your directions are very helpful. I’ve made a roux before and after going gluten free. Your description is so accurate. You think oh, no, this can’t be right, but then it works out fine. ;-) The gumbo looks great! Cajun music is playing in my head. :-)

    Shirley

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  • Alta

    posted on October 8, 2009 at 7:41 am

    I’m going to have to check out that roux video. My husband makes this AMAZING turkey gumbo (Emeril recipe) every year around Thanksgiving, and we’ve tried to sub tapioca starch before, making it gluten-free, but it just doesn’t taste the same. But I’ve only recently discovered the wonders of sorghum flour, so I’ll definitely have to try this blend of sorghum and rice flours! If you say it changes color (to peanut butter) similarly to a “real” roux, then I’m sold. When you adapted this recipe, did you sub the amounts of flour equally, or did you change the ratio of flours to oil? (since different flours have different thickening properties) Thanks! And this gumbo looks DELICIOUS.

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    Amy Reply:

    I measure ‘scantly’ when it comes to oil and I’m cooking (not baking), so I’m sure it was slightly less than 1/2 cup. I think it’s left over from my overweight days. I’ve done roux with my basic gf blend and it worked great. Then, GF Girl used sorghum and sweet rice so I did too, and it worked really well too. It’s a totally different monster than gluten roux. I would love to know your experience with this as you have some real gumbo experience. Let me know how it works out. I would love to learn more about making the very best GF roux.

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    Alta Reply:

    After making this recipe, I do have to say it was really, really tasty! I think next time I do need to more “scantily” measure the oil, as you said. I used brown rice flour instead of sweet rice (it’s what I had), and I think that if we even let the roux deepen in color (almost to chocolate) it would have added even more flavor. I omitted the okra because hubby doesn’t like okra (but I would have loved it in there). But overall, a WONDERFUL gumbo that takes a lot less time than most! My husband had two HUGE bowlfuls (we ate it with steamed rice), and the next day I had some for lunch. Yum, definitely will make again!

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    Amy Reply:

    I agree that the oil can be too much. I am going to add that in the recipe notes. Sweet rice flour will thicken much better than brown rice flour will, which could have been part of the issue too. I like the idea about letting the roux get even darker. So glad that you liked it – Joe had seconds and I froze the extra so he can take it for lunch. I know traditionally it is served with white rice but I don’t eat it. :) Also, I used turkey kielbasa which is much lower in fat but if I didn’t care about the fat I’d use the regular kielbasa.

    I always appreciate you sharing your results here. Big hugs!

  • Sandy Gillett

    posted on October 8, 2009 at 9:22 am

    Thank you for the information about the roux. I will be making a light roux today because I am attempting GF/DF Adfredo sauce using Mimic Creme. (I will add a little Parmesan so not totally DF) I did vote but really, I love whatever you make.

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    Amy Reply:

    Can’t wait to hear about that, Sandy. It sounds fabulous. Where do you buy your Mimic Creme?

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  • Tiffany S.

    posted on October 8, 2009 at 11:18 am

    I can never get enough soup so bring it on!

    Roux has always scared me – one of those challenges of cooking I just never felt up to. Funny, I just tried turkey kielbasa for the first time. It was alright. I think I prefer the texture of sausage more.

    Thanks for all the great recipes, as always! maybe I’ll get some cooking done this weekend!

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    Amy Reply:

    The greasy sausage upsets my stomach. Joe loves it, though, so I cook it for him. Roux can be scary but once you try it it’s like anything else. Just some butter and flour and, if you’re like me, you just pitch it when you burn it and start over.

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  • Jenn AKA The Leftover Queen

    posted on October 8, 2009 at 12:19 pm

    This looks great Amy! Like Joe I love soups and stews, so I am looking forward to more and more soups on your blog!

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  • cheryl

    posted on October 8, 2009 at 3:46 pm

    I LOVE gumbo and it’s one of DH’s faves, so it’s great to see this post!

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  • sandra

    posted on February 6, 2010 at 8:25 am

    This sounds yummy. Perfect for a snowy day. I will try it.

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  • Vincent

    posted on July 20, 2010 at 11:51 am

    Amy,

    I’m really excited that you’ve gotten the chance to try gumbo! I was born in New Orleans so I pretty much grew up on the stuff and I’ve gotta say, it’s never gotten old. I’d used to stick to nothing but a traditional very simple gumbo, but as we moved around southern LA my mom picked up a bunch of recipes and ideas. None of them are gluten or sugar free but the point being, there are so many ways to make a gumbo your own. I hope you’ll get the chance to thoroughly explore gumbo. Thanks for sharing! =D

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  • sandra

    posted on August 1, 2010 at 2:09 pm

    This gumbo was excellent and tasted just like the one made with wheat flour.

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