• Lauren

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 10:02 am

    Love this! Apples are essential this time of year, and this tart looks like a lovely way to enjoy them =D.

    [Reply]

  • Sheila

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 11:15 am

    Amy, this really sounds good. I can understand why you had two pieces and then ate it for dessert. It looks SO delicious! Thanks for the tutorial on pie crust, too.

    Happy Foodie Friday…

    XO,

    Sheila :-)

    [Reply]

  • Liz@HoosierHomemade

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 11:50 am

    You may have just convinced me to try butter instead of my oil. :)
    I thought I was the only one that used my body to keep the pie crust from slipping around :)
    Thanks for sharing another great recipe!
    ~Liz

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    What does the oil do for the crust? That’s what I want to know. I think it would make a more tender crust, where butter makes it flaky.

    [Reply]

  • Mary

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    I’ve bookmarked this recipe to share with family members that are gluten intolerant. Thanks so much! Have a great day.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Thanks, Mary. That’s a huge honor coming from you. Hugs!

    [Reply]

  • Jessica Meyer

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 1:11 pm

    This recipe looks so delicious. It would be a great one to use during Thanksgiving. Thanks for the tip :)
    ATXglutenfree

    [Reply]

  • Geri@heartnsoulcooking

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 1:28 pm

    GREAT!!! recipe, looks wonderful. THANKS!!! for the recipe. Geri

    [Reply]

  • Gail

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 4:02 pm

    Your tart is BEAUTIFUL!!

    Blessings!
    Gail

    [Reply]

  • angi

    posted on October 9, 2009 at 7:27 pm

    perfect for apple season

    [Reply]

  • Alta

    posted on October 10, 2009 at 8:31 am

    This looks great! Have you used this pie crust for other pies? It’s pie-making season, so I’m gearing up for some sort of pie-making extravaganza. (of course, so far, this is all in my head, but still…)

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    No but it will work. I promise. It was a pie crust recipe that I just rolled out flat. I’m going to use it in a pie hopefully this weekend – if you want I’ll be the guinea pig. I’ll share results. :) (By the way…Joe got up this morning and asked me to make this again so he can eat it tonight. He never does that!)

    [Reply]

  • Mari

    posted on October 10, 2009 at 10:12 am

    This is one recipe that I am dying to try; it’s so beautiful, and the recipe reads like it will be even better than I think. This will make a lovely change from my husband’s pies. His tend to be too crunchy for my taste, but this one looks so good. Just perfect. Thanks for sharing.

    [Reply]

  • gfe--gluten free easily

    posted on October 10, 2009 at 11:34 am

    Amy–This is one of those recipe photos that looks so good, so perfect, it doesn’t look real!! Incredible. Love the simple concept, although I’m not sure anything with a crust you have to roll is simple. LOL I’ll trust you though. It all looks wonderfully delectable, so it’s easy to see how you couldn’t stop at one piece. ;-) Have you looked up tastespotting and foodgawker yet? That first or last photo would be awesome for submission. No, I am not connected to either site. I just like to see fab photos get put up on those sites–especially photos of gluten-free dishes. :-)

    In closing … yum,
    Shirley

    [Reply]

  • Jenn

    posted on October 10, 2009 at 9:00 pm

    Looks delicious! I agree about doing things in steps, whenever I do anything with a GF dough, the most important thing I have found is to let the dough rest, handle what you need to, let it rest, handle it again…

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    There are definitely some GF doughs that need to rest. Not all GF baked goods need to rest – I don’t find this to be true with muffins, cakes, or most fruit-sweetened doughs as getting it into the oven is much more important so it rises properly. But letting this rest makes a huge difference in the final product.

    [Reply]

  • Linda

    posted on October 11, 2009 at 7:11 pm

    That looks great. I made a great pumpkin pie last week and was very pleased with how the crust turned out. The recipe I used is similar to yours, but uses more butter. I’m going to try it again cutting back on the butter. I used a silicone mat under the dough and plastic wrap on top. That worked well. The silicone didn’t move around. Thanks for sharing your recipe.

    [Reply]

  • Sandy Gillett

    posted on October 12, 2009 at 5:09 pm

    I like the way you make things in squares and rectangles. (I am very linear) Thank you for the flaky pie crust tips.

    [Reply]

  • Ruth

    posted on October 12, 2009 at 6:43 pm

    mmmmm! That looks yummy!

    [Reply]

  • Amy @ Finer Things

    posted on October 13, 2009 at 1:57 pm

    You should open a restaurant. :)

    [Reply]

  • Amy

    posted on October 14, 2009 at 2:53 pm

    @Amy @ Finer Things, I’d love to someday. I tell Joe that one of these days I’m going to open up a little place with out-of-this-world soups, sandwiches, and desserts.

    [Reply]

  • Denice

    posted on November 11, 2009 at 6:40 am

    We just found out that daughter can’t eat gluten, corn, soy or potato.

    My daughter had big plans to do the menu planning, and a lot of the cooking and baking for the holidays. Now she is worried that she won’t be able to have any special holiday food so, I’m trying to help her find alternatives. The results of this recipe look similar to the crust my grandmother taught me to make, which would be a delightful comfort during the holidays.

    I’ve noticed that GF foods often use potato starch. I had thought I could substitute sweet rice flour or tapioca flour when a recipe called for a couple of Tbs of potato starch, but this recipe calls for 1/2 cup potato starch not a couple of Tbs and sweet rice flour is already in the mix. Does anyone know what the crust results might be if I increase the sweet rice flour or substitute tapioca flour or arrow root? or how about increasing the sorghum or adding teff flour?

    I’d definitely appreciate any input that might put me on the track to success quicker than my own trial and error. I’m afraid I don’t have much emotional courage when it comes to food failures. I had some bad experiences in the past with my own food allergies and I’d like to avoid a possible downward emotional spiral.

    This time with the adjustment to these additional allergies it sure is nice to have the internet and people like you all that frequent this blog. Thank you for giving kitchen and people tested information. This time I don’t feel all alone.

    Thank you for your time and input.
    Sorry this got so long.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Denice, I have not made this with anything but potato starch but you might try arrowroot or tapioca. They both are thickeners and might work well. I’ve never tried increasing the sorghum either so I can’t tell you about that.

    I used to get upset when I had a baking disaster but I’ve come to a place where I look what I did, decide what went wrong, and then try again. Now I know I’m just one step closer to the product I want. It’s a little cliche, but the truth really is that failure is not getting up again after you fall. The real success is in trying one more time.

    [Reply]

  • Alta

    posted on November 20, 2009 at 2:16 pm

    Amy – will the pie crust freeze well? I’m looking to plan ahead as much as possible for thanksgiving, and I want to try out your crust. Was thinking maybe if I put it in the pan ahead of time and froze it, I’d save myself that much time. Thoughts? Also, where do you find your sweet rice flour?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    Good question. It stays well baked in the fridge, at least with filling in it. I made a pie last week and we kept it in the fridge. Tested the crust yesterday and it was still great. I had some already baked pie crust from the butternut squash tart I made in the freezer – I just popped it in the microwave to see what happpened. It was mushy. If it was me, I’d make one tonight, roll it out tomorrow, freeze it and bake it on Sunday or Monday. I know, more time now but it would save time later if it worked.

    Sweet rice flour 0 I buy Ener-G brand at Central Market. They might have it at Whole Foods, too. I just can’t remember right now.

    [Reply]

  • Loflin

    posted on December 1, 2009 at 12:04 pm

    I made your apple tart for the day before Thanksgiving and it was gone before all the guests arrived Thanksgiving Day! Thankfully I rolled out the extra crust dough and put it in the freezer so I was able to make another one smaller one just for me Friday after everyone left!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Loflin, So you froze the dough and it worked?? That has been the big buzz around here and on Twitter. I’m thrilled you enjoyed the tart and that you had enough for yourself. Thanks for letting me know!

    [Reply]

    Loflin Reply:

    @Amy, Both times I made the tart, one side of the crust was a bit soggy from the apple juice. I just cooked it a bit longer. I have 2 more rectangular crusts in the freezer, so I guess I’ll just HAVE to try it out again.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Loflin, I wonder why – my crust has never been soggy. It actually gets crispy around the edges. Does your baking sheet flax during baking?

    Amy Reply:

    @Loflin, What kind of apples are you using?

    Loflin Reply:

    @Amy, My cookie sheet does flex during baking, so next time I’m going to try an old airbake pan I have. It does get crispy on 2 edges, but usually soggy on 2 edges no matter how I rotate the pan. I’m using Granny Smith apples as specified…they’re my favorite. I can’t eat raw apples b/c of intolerances, but cooked are just fine.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Loflin, Maybe it’s the pan…it’s hard to tell. The juices do run off but they just caramelize, not get soggy. I am making this again this weekend so I’ll watch mine and see if I notice anything.

  • Alta (Tasty Eats At Home)

    posted on February 18, 2010 at 1:05 pm

    So I made a turkey pot pie last night using this pie crust. While I still need to work on the filling part, the crust was probably the best crust I’ve ever made – GF or not! I eliminated the agave nectar for a savory crust and bumped up the salt a bit – but WOW. It was relatively workable (the previous GF crusts I’ve tried were super-crumbly and there was no avoiding it breaking when trying to put into a pan) and so flaky, light, and perfect. I think we might just have to have dinner-in-pie-form a lot in the next few weeks!

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Alta (Tasty Eats At Home), Wonderful!! I have never made a pot pie from scratch but I am craving one now after hearing how wonderful this turned out.

    It really is a great crust, isn’t it?

    [Reply]

  • Maggie

    posted on October 31, 2010 at 9:33 am

    Amy I love reading your older posts! I didn’t know you at this time! This looks amazing and so professional! Impressive. xo

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Maggie, I can crank out some great stuff when I have the time!! LOL!! Lately it’s been throw and go.

    This is Joe’s favorite. I need to make it again with the new pie crust I’ve been working with…I think it would be even better. :)

    [Reply]

  • Janis

    posted on October 31, 2010 at 10:49 am

    Hi,
    I’d like to try this recipe, but can’t find sorghum flour in the stores. What would be a good substitute for it? Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Janis, Try millet. That works well. Another great one is garbanzo-fava flour by Bob’s Red Mill. Brown rice flour would work, too, but I’d whirl it in my coffee grinder first because it can be a little grainy. Have fun, Janis!!

    [Reply]

  • honeyfrog

    posted on November 19, 2010 at 8:31 am

    So, what does the sweet rice flour add to this recipe?
    Can I sub an extra few TBs of white rice flour for the sweet rice?

    Melissa

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @honeyfrog, You can try it but I’ve found that sweet rice flour works best for creating a flaky crust. Let me know if you use white rice flour, Melissa. I’d love to hear what you think.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • lana

    posted on November 20, 2010 at 2:05 pm

    This pie crust sound delicious. If I substitute white rice flour with brown rice and potato starch for amarath flour, would it be the same results?

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @lana, Good question, Lana. I don’t know. I’ve found pie crusts to be fussy. I don’t think amaranth would work in place of the potato starch – they have such different properties. You can always give it a try.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Kathy Palace

    posted on June 17, 2011 at 6:03 pm

    Forgive, you have a recipe called “Flaky Pie Crust” and I was wondering about the amount of “ice-cold water” is it 1/4 Cup?

    Thank you very much,
    Kathy

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    @Kathy Palace, Thanks for letting me know – yes, it’s 1/4 cup. I fixed the recipe, too.

    Hugs,
    Amy

    [Reply]

  • Shu Han

    posted on September 17, 2011 at 1:23 am

    I also made my first venture into gf shortcrust pastry! I’m not celiac, but I seem to break out when I have wheat ): Looking forward to trying out more gf recipes!

    [Reply]

  • Sonya

    posted on October 18, 2011 at 10:07 am

    Hi Amy! I’m so glad to have found your website, as my husband was just diagnosed with Celiac’s a couple of months ago. Thank you for sharing your story and your forays into SF and GF cooking–your blog is a joy to read. And I love that you’re in Dallas–we are in Allen. :)

    I am working on tweaking some Thanksgiving favorites to be GF and have a couple of questions about your pastry crust. Have you converted this recipe to grams as you have with some others? If not, can you tell me if I should measure your recipes by dipping the measuring cups directly into the flours, or spooning the flours into the cups?

    Thanks, and I look forward to trying this and many other of your recipes!

    [Reply]

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